Illinois CLE: 30 Credit Hours by June 30

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For about half of the Illinois attorneys, it’s just about that time for you.  Time to get your Illinois CLE requirement done!  The June 30 IL MCLE deadline will be here before you know it.  Why procrastinate … when you can get started now and complete your Illinois MCLE requirement in plenty of time.

Illinois MCLE Compliance Requirements:

  • Reporting Cycle: 2 years
  • Compliance Deadline: June 30
  • Reporting Deadline: July 31

In Illinois, there are two different MCLE reporting groups for CLE compliance purposes.  The reporting groups are based on the attorney’s last name.[1]  Illinois attorneys whose last name starts with A – M must complete 30 IL CLE credit hours by June 30, 2014.  The deadline to report IL CLE compliance is July 31.

Illinois MCLE Reporting Periods:

  • Last names A – M: July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2014
  • Last names N – Z: July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2015

Attorneys licensed in Illinois may satisfy all 30 IL CLE credit hours through online IL CLE courses.  Attorney Credits is an Accredited Provider in Illinois and all of our Illinois CLE courses are presumptively pre-approved by the Illinois MCLE Board.  For more information about Illinois CLE requirements, deadlines and CLE compliance packages, please click the following link: Illinois CLE.


[1] As your last name as it appears on the master roll of attorneys.

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What is CLER?

Every state regulates the conduct of its own attorneys – everything from Bar admissions to requiring a certain amount of pro bono hours every year.  And continuing legal education is no exception.  At this point in time, CLE is mandatory in the majority of states around the country – although there are a few holdovers like Michigan and Maryland.

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Each state even has its own name for the mandatory continuing legal education that is required of its attorneys.  Some states call it MCLE (Minimum Continuing Legal Education) some states simply call it mandatory CLE – and then there’s Florida.  The official name for the continuing education required of attorneys in Florida is the Florida CLER – or Florida Continuing Legal Education Requirement.

CLER, or Continuing Legal Education Requirement, was adopted by the Supreme Court of Florida in 1988 and requires all members of The Florida Bar to continue their legal education.[1]

The Florida CLER was adopted by the Supreme Court of Florida in 1988 and requires all members of The Florida Bar to complete a certain amount of continuing legal education.  Each three year compliance period, every Florida attorney must complete 30 FL CLE credit hours.[2]  Of these 30 required credit hours, 5 must be in the area of ethics, professionalism, substance abuse, or mental illness awareness.

Attorney Credits offers a number of pre-approved Florida CLE courses and also offers a number of different 30 credit hour FL CLE compliance packages: Florida CLE.


[1] What is CLER?

http://www.floridabar.org/tfb/TFBMember.nsf/ed6e4bcb92a8fe1b852567090069f3c2/dde037de5dcfe59885256b2f006c6a4d?OpenDocument#What%20isCLER%3F

[2] Members of The Florida Bar are required to report FL CLE hours earned every three years. Each Florida attorney is assigned a three year reporting cycle. You can find your reporting date on the mailing label of The Florida Bar News.

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Texas CLE FAQ

When do I have to complete my Texas CLE credits?

When do I report CLE compliance in Texas?

How do I report compliance?

These are some of the questions that we hear everyday when we speak to attorneys that use our AttorneyCredits.com website for CLE compliance.  We know that a number of attorneys have questions about CLE compliance, from credit requirements to late CLE reporting.  The information is not always easy to find and the state bars don’t always make things easy for you.

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In order to help Texas attorneys find the CLE information they need, we have created a CLE FAQ for Texas attorneys.  Attorneys in the Lonestar State are required by the State Bar of Texas to complete their CLE obligation each year.  Luckily for attorneys in Texas, they may complete their entire TX CLE requirement through online and downloadable TX CLE courses.

Top Texas CLE Questions

What are the mandatory CLE requirements in Texas?

  • Texas attorneys must complete a minimum of 15 TX CLE credit hours each annual TX CLE compliance period, including 3 hours of Legal Ethics.

How many online Texas CLE courses can I take through Attorney Credits?

  • Attorneys admitted to the State Bar of Texas may complete fifteen (15) TX CLE credit hours through on demand online TX CLE courses. Attorney Credits online and offline TX CLE courses qualify for participatory CLE credit in Texas.

When must I complete my TX CLE requirement and report my TX CLE compliance?

  • The Texas CLE compliance year is a one-year period that begins on the first day of the month you were born and ends one year later on the last day of the month that precedes the month of your birth. Each Texas attorney is given an automatic grace period to complete and report mandatory TX CLE hours for the TX CLE compliance year. This TX CLE grace period runs until the end of the birth month.

Does Attorney Credits keep track and report my TX CLE hours completed?

  • Yes, Attorney Credits does report your TX CLE credit completed to the State Bar of Texas. We send completed lists to the State Bar of Texas every Monday.[1]

Whose responsibility is it to ensure that TX CLE hours are properly reported?

  • Since Texas is a self-reporting CLE state you must verify the receipt of your TX CLE compliance information with the State Bar of Texas.[2]

Does the State Bar of Texas keep a record of my CLE activities completed?

  • Yes, the Texas MCLE Department does track an attorney’s mandatory CLE compliance through the MCLE Annual Verification Report.

How do I report my Texas CLE compliance?

  • Your MCLE Annual Verification Report will be mailed to you by the State Bar of Texas eight (8) weeks before the month of your birth and it is your duty to review this report carefully. If the Verification Report indicates that you have completed the required number of TX CLE hours, then you do not have to take any further action.[3]

Who can I contact for more information about TX CLE?

  • For more information about CLE in Texas call the Texas MCLE Department at (512) 427-1806. You may also contact Attorney Credits support via email or telephone. For further assistance and information, please call our Support Center at 877-910-MCLE (6253) or visit the support page on the website.

Attorney Credits is an accredited CLE provider in Texas.[4]  Texas attorneys may complete TX CLE courses in the following media formats: streaming video & audio, MP3 and video download (MP4).  We also offer MP3 Player and USB Stick compliance packages that come pre-loaded with all 15 required TX CLE credit hours.

For more information about CLE in Texas, please click the following link: Texas CLE.


[1] Attorney Credits reports on Monday for all courses completed the previous Monday 12:00:01 AM to Sunday 12:59:59 PM.

[2] Texas attorneys are ultimately responsible for reporting completion of their TX CLE requirement to the State Bar of Texas.

[3] If you have not completed or reported the minimum 15 TX CLE credit hours by the last day of your TX CLE compliance year, a reminder notice will be emailed and mailed to you by the State Bar of Texas at the beginning of your birth month. If you are not in compliance with your mandatory TX CLE requirement you can either report your TX CLE compliance online or submit a coded Credit Input Form that is mailed along with your MCLE Annual Verification Report.

[4] Attorney Credits state CLE provider number is 12507.

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The Illinois CLE Deadline is June 30

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June 30 is the deadline to complete the MCLE (Minimum Continuing Legal Education) requirement for Illinois attorneys.  Illinois attorneys must complete 30 IL CLE credit hours each two-year MCLE compliance period.  As part of the 30 hour IL CLE requirement, attorneys must complete a minimum of 6 credit hours of Professional Responsibility.[1]

Illinois MCLE Compliance Requirements:

  • Reporting Cycle: 2 years
  • Compliance Deadline: June 30
  • Reporting Deadline: July 31

Illinois is broken up into two different MCLE reporting groups for compliance purposes.  The reporting groups are based on the attorney’s last name and depend on the first letter of the attorney’s last name as it appears on the master roll of attorneys.  Illinois attorneys with the last name A – M must report their IL CLE compliance by June 30, 2014.

Illinois MCLE Reporting Periods:

  • Last names A – M: July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2014
  • Last names N – Z: July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2015

Illinois is a self-reporting state and CLE providers do not report for individual attorneys.  All Illinois attorneys are required to report compliance, non-compliance or exemptions by the end of the attorney’s two-year IL MCLE reporting period.  The Illinois MCLE Board will mail a Certification Form to each Illinois attorney at the mailing address on file with the ARDC.[2]  In order to timely complete MCLE reporting, the Certification Form must be completed and returned to the MCLE Board by the due date printed on the form.

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois.  For more information about CLE in Illinois please click the following link: Illinois CLE.


[1] Professional responsibility CLE credits include courses in professionalism, diversity, mental illness & addiction issues, civility and legal ethics.

[2] ARDC stands for Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Commission.

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New York CLE: Reporting CLE Compliance

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Experienced New York attorneys must complete a minimum of 24 accredited CLE credit hours during each two-year reporting period.[1] According to the New York CLE Rules, an “experienced” New York attorney is an attorney that has been admitted to the New York Bar for more than two years.  Please be advised that newly admitted attorneys in New York have their own set of special CLE requirements.[2]

NY CLE Requirements — Experienced Attorneys

  • NY CLE Credits Required: 24
  • Reporting Cycle: 2 years
  • Compliance Deadline: Date of Birth
  • Reporting Deadline: 30 days after your birthday

As part of the NY CLE requirement, New York attorneys must also report their NY CLE compliance.  New York is a self-reporting CLE state.  New York attorneys must report their own CLE compliance with the NY CLE requirements.  CLE providers do not report CLE compliance for New York attorneys.

How do I report my New York CLE compliance?

The New York CLE Board will mail you an attorney registration form. You must file your attorney registration form and indicate that you have completed your MCLE requirement within 30 days after your birthday on alternate years. At the time of your biennial registration, you must certify that you have completed your MCLE requirement for that reporting cycle and that you have retained the proper documentation.

Attorney Credits offers NY CLE (Continuing Legal Education) for attorneys in New York and around the country.  For more information about completing the mandatory New York CLE requirement, please click here NY CLE.


[1] The biennial reporting cycle is defined as the two-year period between your attorney registrations.  The registration card is sent to you around the time of your birthday.

[2] Attorneys that are newly admitted New York State Bar Association must complete a minimum of 16 “transitional” NY CLE credit hours – in each of the first two years of admission for a total of thirty-two (32) CLE credit hours.  Sixteen of those credit hours must be in the following areas: Skills, Ethics and Professionalism & Law Practice Management and/or Areas of Professional Practice. The first set of 16 transitional NY CLE credit hours must be completed by the first anniversary of admission to the New York Bar Association in the designated categories of credit. The second set of 16 transitional CLE credit hours must be completed between the 1st and 2nd anniversaries of admission to the New York Bar.

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Late Nevada CLE Compliance

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Attorneys that are subject to the Nevada CLE requirement must complete at least twelve (12) CLE credit hours each annual NV CLE compliance period as part of their mandatory continuing legal education (CLE) requirement.  As part of the 12 unit Nevada CLE requirement, attorneys must complete at least two (2) credit hours of legal ethics.[1]  All NV CLE credit hours must be completed and reported by December 31 to remain compliant with the Nevada CLE requirement.

Nevada CLE Compliance Requirements

  • Reporting Cycle: Annual
  • Compliance Deadline: December 31
  • Reporting Deadline: December 31

If you did not complete your NV CLE requirement by the December 31 deadline, please visit the Nevada CLE Board website or call the CLE Board’s office for specific instructions on how to obtain an extension of your deadline.  Generally, extensions are only granted until March 1.[2]  If the attorney has a history of late CLE compliance the CLE Board may deny the request for extension.[3]

Extensions

If you haven’t completed your CLE credits by December 31, you can request an extension of time.

Nevada attorneys that fail to file their Nevada CLE compliance report and/or pay fees by the March 1 extension deadline are subject to a late fee of $100.00.[4]  Attorneys that are served a Notice of Noncompliance will have until May 1 to make up the CLE deficiencies outlined in the Notice.  After May 1, continued noncompliance will result in the attorney’s name being placed on a Petition to the Supreme Court for suspension.[5]

Does the Nevada CLE Board keep a record of my CLE activities?

The Nevada CLE Board tracks your NV CLE compliance.  In October, the Nevada CLE Board mails out a courtesy notice to all members of the Nevada Bar. In January of the following year, the Nevada CLE Board will mail you a Compliance Report (Form 6) reflecting CLE credits that you earned from the previous CLE compliance year.

Don’t risk fines or suspension – start completing your Nevada CLE requirement today!  To access Attorney Credits’ Nevada CLE compliance packages please click the following link: Nevada CLE.


[1] In 2013, Nevada also made substance abuse a required CLE course.  However, since substance abuse was mandatory for the compliance year in 2013, and Nevada attorneys only have to complete 1 credit hour of substance abuse every three years, substance abuse will not be mandatory again until 2016.

[2] You must send a written request to the NV CLE Board along with a $50 extension fee to the CLE Board’s office. The request must include the reason for your CLE deficiency and the name of the course(s) that you plan to attend to cure the deficiency.

[3] Continued noncompliance can result in suspension of license to practice law in Nevada.

[4] The Notice of Noncompliance will not be sent by certified mail but by 1st class mail.

[5] This will happen around June 1 and those members who comply after the petition is filed will be assessed an additional $250.00 Consent to Dismissal fee.  If a member has previously been placed on a Petition at any time within the preceding 5 year period, the Consent to Dismissal fee will be charged on a sliding scale from $350.00 – $1,250.00. The amount of the fee will depend on the number of times that the attorney has previously been placed on petition.

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How to Avoid Legal Malpractice Claims

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Over the last few decades, the incidence of legal malpractice claims has greatly increased as more clients have begun to sue their attorneys for substandard work.  There are many reasons to explain the increased number of legal malpractice claims, and the recent downturn in the economy has only generated more malpractice claims.  In order to avoid these lawsuits, attorneys must be extremely cognizant of their ethical duties to their clients and also the major sources of client discontent that lead to the greatest amount of legal malpractice claims.

“Pay attention to the details because they separate mediocrity from excellence” – Mark Wilson

To learn how you can provide excellent service to your clients and avoid legal malpractice claims, please join attorney Mark Wilson for a look at the areas that lead to malpractice liability.  Establishing a good rapport with the client, paying attention to your ethical duties and providing excellent legal service to your client can help you to avoid major pitfalls and malpractice lawsuits.  The main issues discussed include recent malpractice trends, how best to proceed if you decide to accept the case, the importance of using fee agreements, early preparation, giving the client guidance, intelligent time keeping, learning your craft and client trust accounts.  To access the course, please click here: How to Avoid Legal Malpractice Claims.

Further topics addressed in this CLE course include:

  • The reputation of attorneys
  • Malpractice statistics
  • The downturn in the economy & the increased incidence of malpractice claims
  • Deciding whether to accept the assignment
  • Avoiding difficult clients
  • Appearance & reality
  • Documenting the attorney-client relationship
  • Avoiding conflicts of interest
  • Conflict waiver letters
  • The retainer agreement
  • Corresponding frequently with clients
  • Jury instructions
  • Why information is not enough
  • Block billing
  • “No charge”
  • Proper staffing
  • Timekeepers
  • Competence
  • Workload
  • Client trust accounts
  • Attention to detail

A seasoned trial attorney and skilled negotiator, Mark B. Wilson has won nearly every case he has tried or arbitrated and has lost only one jury trial in which the appellate court reversed the judgment in his client’s favor.  He tries cases in both federal and state courts in a variety of practice areas, including copyright infringement, construction defects, covenants not to compete, breach of contract, attorney malpractice, unlawful detainer and personal injury.  He and his partner Gerald Klein have recovered nearly $100 million in plaintiffs’ cases and have won defense verdicts in “bet the company” cases where millions of dollars were on the table.  For eight consecutive years he has been acknowledged as a Southern California Super Lawyer in the areas of business litigation, construction litigation and intellectual property litigation. He is also recognized as one of the top trial attorneys in Orange County by OC Register Metro magazine and Mr. Wilson has also achieved an “AV” rating from Martindale-Hubbell.  A frequent lecturer to bar organizations on modern trial techniques, he has also authored several articles on trial practice.

This CLE course on handling media attention is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country.  For more information about CLE in Illinois  please click the following link: Illinois CLE.

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Discriminatory Client Preferences and the Practice of Law

While managing or operating a law practice attorneys must not unlawfully discriminate or knowingly permit unlawful discrimination on the basis of sex, race, sexual orientation, age, national origin, or disability during the course of employment or while accepting or terminating representation of a client. But what if it is the client that is asking you to act in a discriminatory manner? Do you have to honor your duty to zealously defend your client or are you bound by your ethical duties as an attorney?

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Join attorney Dan Eaton as he provides excellent analysis and feedback on this tricky subject and further explores discriminatory client preferences and the practice of law.  The main topics addressed in this presentation include an attorney’s ethical duties, conditions of representation, withdrawal and employment laws.  Mr. Eaton also discusses case law in this area and provides hypothetical situations based off existing case law regarding discriminatory client and business preferences.  To access the course please click here: Discriminatory Client Preferences and the Practice of Law.

California Rule 2-400 Prohibited Discriminatory Conduct in a Law Practice.

(B) In the management or operation of a law practice, a member shall not unlawfully discriminate or knowingly permit unlawful discrimination on the basis of race , national origin, sex, sexual orientation, religion, age or disability in:

(1) hiring, promoting, discharging, or otherwise determining the conditions of employment of any person; or

(2) accepting or terminating representation of any client.

Daniel E. Eaton is a shareholder with Seltzer Caplan McMahon Vitek in the Litigation Department and practices employment law.  Mr. Eaton received his B.S. from Georgetown University in 1984 and received his law degree, cum laude, from the Harvard Law School in 1989.  Prior to joining Seltzer Caplan McMahon Vitek, Mr. Eaton was with Proskauer Rose in Los Angeles from 1995 to 1998 and with Gray Cary Ware & Freidenrich from 1989 to 1995. He was an Adjunct Professor of Law at Western State College of Law in 1993. He also has taught employment law at the University of California, San Diego, and both human resources law and business ethics at San Diego State University. From 1983 to 1986, Mr. Eaton served as an aide to Pennsylvania’s U.S. Senator Arlen Specter.

This CLE course on handling media attention is currently accredited in the following states:

  • California (CA) – 1.0 Credit Hours Elimination of Bias
  • New Jersey (NJ) – 1.0 Credit Hours Legal Ethics
  • New York (NY) - 1.0 Credit Hours Legal Ethics

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country.  For more information about CLE in New York  please click the following link: New York CLE.

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How to Handle Cases with High Media Attention

In today’s 24/7 news cycle attorneys must be cognizant of media attention and how to handle high profile cases that end up in the headlines.  Nowadays, you can take a case involving a high school student doing a partially nude photo spread for the school newspaper …. and wake up the next morning with 50 voicemails from various local and national media outlets.  But how do you handle this media attention?

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If you need some practice points on how to handle cases with high media attention then please join Dan Gilleon as he discusses the risks, benefits and ethical pitfalls of taking high exposure cases.  The main topics discussed during this presentation include the benefits of media exposure for your cases, issues to consider when your case becomes newsworthy, the ethical & tactical risks of increased media coverage and the fine points of presenting your case to the news media.  To access the course please click  here: How to Handle Cases with High Media Attention.

Further items discussed in this CLE course include:

  • Getting more witnesses & evidence from media coverage
  • Three types of media exposure
  • Commentator issues
  • Getting authorization from your client
  • Journalism ethics
  • The risks of not commenting on a case
  • Preparing your client for the possible negative reactions
  • Making sure the case has already been filed
  • Intangible benefits
  • Creating sound bites
  • Using the media to level the playing field for your client
  • Negative public perceptions
  • Getting informed consent from your client
  • Releasing confidential information, trial publicity rules
  • Affecting the outcome of a case
  • Irritating the judge
  • Criminal cases
  • Confidentiality
  • Extortion
  • Live vs. recorded interviews
  • Ways to get media coverage
  • Trust
  • Appearance

Daniel M. Gilleon has spent more than a decade at the forefront of San Diego personal injury and civil rights litigation.  Known as a tenacious litigator, his outstanding track record makes him a distinguished legal voice in the local and national media.  Mr. Gilleon practices in the areas of personal injury, employment law and civil rights.

This CLE course on handling media attention is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country.  For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: California CLE.

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Behind the Cloud and How it Can Be Used in the Legal Industry

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We now live in a wired, online world where technology has become pervasive.  What was once sent by the U.S. mail only a few years ago is now sent by email.  What was once kept in a file cabinet under lock and key is now stored on a thumb drive, the hard drive of your computer or a massive data center.  You and your law firm would like to be able to take advantage of new technologies like “cloud computing,” but you have concerns … is it safe?  How can you ensure that you are fulfilling your ethical duties as an attorney and protecting your client’s confidential information?

“When transmitting a communication that includes information relating to the representation of a client, the lawyer must take reasonable precautions to prevent the information from coming into the hands of unintended recipients.  This duty, however, does not require that the lawyer use special security measures if the method of communication affords a reasonable expectation of privacy.”

– ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, Comment 17, Rule 1.6

To learn more about how the “cloud” can be deployed to make your law practice run more effectively and efficiently, please join Andres Hernandez of Wingman Legal Tech for a great discussion on utilizing cloud computing in your law firm.  The main issues discussed in this CLE course include common legal industry concerns with the cloud, what the cloud is, how the cloud benefits law firms, the ethics of cloud computing, “reasonable” precautions and the technical aspects of securing your client data & how this relates to your ethical duties.  To access the course, please click here: Behind the Cloud and How it Can Be Used in the Legal Industry.

Further issues addressed include:

  • Lawyers & technology
  • Analogies of cloud computing
  • Improving the client experience
  • Convenience
  • Security
  • Comment 17 to ABA Model Rule 1.6
  • Data centers
  • Choosing a vendor
  • Clio
  • Office365
  • Calendar Rules
  • Carbonite
  • IT partners
  • DropBox

Andres Hernandez is the owner of Wingman LegalTech, an IT Services company that focuses on law firm security and technology.  After serving four years in the Marine Corps and going to night school for six years, Andres co-founded BIIS Solutions (which is now Wingman LegalTech) in 2005.  Andres is a frequent lecturer on various law & technology CLE topics and is very active in the San Diego legal and business community.

This CLE course is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country.  For more information about CLE in Illinois please click the following link: Illinois CLE.

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