Florida CLE: 30 Credit Hours Every 3 Years

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Every state regulates the conduct of its own attorneys inside its own borders – everything from bar admission to the grounds for disbarment (and everything in between).  Each state also sets rules for the continuing legal education that its attorneys must complete. The required CLE that Florida attorneys must complete is called the CLER. The Florida CLER – or Continuing Legal Education Requirement – was adopted by the Supreme Court of Florida in 1988 and it requires all members of The Florida Bar to complete continuing legal education once they have been admitted to the Bar.[1]

Florida calls it mandatory continuing legal education program the CLER – Continuing Legal Education Requirement.

The Florida CLER requires all members of The Florida Bar (without an exception) to continue their legal education by completing Florida CLE courses.  Each three-year compliance period members of the Florida Bar must complete a minimum of 30 FL CLE credit hours – including 5 credit hours in the area of ethics, professionalism, substance abuse, or mental illness awareness. The Florida CLE compliance groups are determined at random by The Florida Bar.[2]

Does The Florida Bar allow credit for audio/video or computer CLE?

Florida lawyers may satisfy all Florida CLE requirements through online CLE courses.[3]

Florida attorneys may complete all 30 required CLER credit hours through online and offline CLE courses.  The Florida Bar allows the entire CLER to be fulfilled via streaming video, audio & video download, CD CLE courses.  For more information about Attorney Credits’ Florida CLE courses and the CLER in Florida please click this link: Florida CLE.

[1] Frequently Asked About CLER

http://www.floridabar.org/tfb/TFBMember.nsf/ed6e4bcb92a8fe1b852567090069f3c2/dde037de5dcfe59885256b2f006c6a4d?

[2] Each member of the Florida Bar is assigned a three-year CLE reporting cycle. If you do not know your FL CLE reporting date, you may find your reporting date on the mailing label of The Florida Bar News. You will receive a CLER Reporting Affidavit three months before the end of your Florida CLE reporting cycle if you still lack 30 FL CLE credit hours.

[3] Florida CLE FAQ

http://www.attorneycredits.com/florida-cle-faq

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California CLE

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Do you have questions about your California MCLE requirement? The California State Bar requires members to complete 25 hours of approved continuing legal education (“CLE”) every 3 years. The compliance deadline for California attorneys with last names H-M is February 2, 2015.[1]

California MCLE Compliance & Reporting Requirements

  • Reporting Cycle: 3 years
  • Compliance Deadline: January 31
  • Reporting Deadline: February 2
  • Compliance Group: Last Names H-M

It is now more important than ever to make sure that you are properly completing your CA MCLE requirement. The State Bar of California has greatly increased the amount of annual MCLE audits and as many as 10% of the attorneys in the next MCLE compliance group will be audited. It is extremely important to make sure you complete 25 total credit hours including 4 credit hours of legal ethics, 1 credit hour of elimination of bias and 1 credit hour of substance abuse. It is also extremely important to make sure that you complete at least 12.5 credit hours of participatory CLE credit.

What if I didn’t take enough courses during the compliance period?[2]

Failure to complete the requirements during the compliance period will result in your having to make up the deficiency. You will have to submit all required hours to the online log and then mail in the proof of compliance. You will also need to provide the audit submission cover sheet, a cover letter explaining why you were unable to complete the requirements during the compliance period along with the $75 penalty for non-compliance by the deadline

The State Bar of California has provided an excellent FAQ about CA MCLE audits. You can also visit our CA MCLE FAQ for answers to all of your California MCLE questions.  Now get that CA CLE done before the February deadline!!

[1] Compliance Groups

http://mcle.calbar.ca.gov/Attorneys/ComplianceInformation/ComplianceGroups.aspx

[2] MCLE Audit FAQs

http://mcle.calbar.ca.gov/MCLE/MCLEAuditFAQ.aspx

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CLE Course on Independent Contractor/ Employee Distinctions

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It is critical that business owners properly determine whether the individuals providing services for the company are employees or independent contractors. Generally, the business must withhold income taxes – in addition to withholding and paying Social Security and Medicare taxes & pay unemployment tax – on wages that are paid to an employee. However, businesses generally do not have to withhold or pay any taxes on payments to independent contractors. For this reason, many businesses prefer to designate workers as independent contractors in order to minimize their tax liability. However, misclassifying an employee as an independent contractor can have serious negative consequences for the employer.

Determining whether a worker is treated as an employee or an independent contractor is determined by a maze of various statutory and IRS tests.

In this course on independent contractor/employee distinctions, attorney Doug Wade will update you on the current lay of the land in this area of employment law and will provide guidance on how your business clients can minimize risk amidst this unpredictable legal environment. The main issues discussed include direct vs. indirect labor, factors, criteria & tests, common mistakes made by attorneys, penalties & enforcement and fixing mistakes. To access the course click here: Independent Contractor/Employee Distinctions: Help Clients (And Your Firm) Minimize Liability.

Further issues addressed by Mr. Wade in this CLE course include:

  • Types of workers
  • The benefits of independent contractors
  • The benefits of employees
  • Practical & legal considerations of classifying workers
  • Joint employment
  • Definitions
  • The employee presumption
  • IRS 3-Criteria
  • The IRS 11-Factor Test
  • The old IRS 20-Factor Test
  • Behavioral & financial control
  • CPAs
  • Common misclassification errors made by lawyers & law firms

Doug Wade is an attorney with the Law Offices of Douglas M. Wade, PLC in Orange County, California. A business and employment attorney whose practice covers most aspects of business & employment law, Doug is an active litigator, and member of the California State Bar’s Corporations Committee. Doug attended Pembroke College, Oxford University receiving a B.A. and M.A. in Jurisprudence in 1990. He also attended the University of San Diego School of Law receiving a Master of Laws in Business and Corporate Law in 1992 and a second Master of Laws in Labor/Employment Law and International/Comparative Law in 1993. After practicing in an international, a mid-sized and a small boutique firm, Doug started his own solo practice in 2009 and has since expanded with an office and associate in San Diego.

This CLE course on Independent Contractor/Employee distinctions is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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New Rules on Raising Capital and Crowdfunding

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The JOBS Act was enacted in 2012 and was intended to reduce barriers to capital formation – especially for smaller companies and startups. On July 10, 2013, the SEC adopted amendments to Rule 506 of Regulation D under the Securities Act to implement the requirements of Section 201(a) of the JOBS Act and these amendments became effective on September 23, 2013. Welcome to the age of crowdfunding!

The JOBS Act requires the SEC to adopt rules amending existing exemptions from registration under the Securities Act of 1933 and creates new exemptions that permit issuers of securities to raise capital without SEC registration.

If you need to learn more about the practical effects of amendments to SEC Rule 506, then join attorney Kelly Bagla as she details what the revised laws means for small businesses and startups that are now looking to raise capital. The main issues discussed include traditional Rule 506 requirements, new Rule 506(c) requirements, general solicitation & general advertising, accredited investor verification, the practical effects for companies looking to raise capital, the definition of crowdfunding, types of crowdfunding and rules regarding crowdfunding.  To access the course please click here: New Rules on Raising Capital and Crowdfunding.

Additional subjects covered by Mrs. Bagla include:

  • Rule 504 & 506 requirements
  • Exemptions to Rule 506
  • Pre-existing relationships
  • Venture capital
  • Raising unlimited capital
  • Four different ways to verify accredited investors
  • Third party accredited investor verification
  • Confidentiality
  • Startups
  • Rules for crowdfunding
  • Kickstarter
  • Disclosures
  • Annual reports
  • 505(c) verification

The founder and general manager of Bagla Law, Kelly Bagla is an experienced corporate and securities attorney who practices in San Diego, California. A multi-degreed lawyer, she began her career with a Fortune 500 global biotechnology company in California, where she managed legal issues for 35 international subsidiaries. She then joined Baker & McKenzie, an international law firm based in San Diego, where she advised domestic and international clients on corporate and securities issues. Kelly subsequently joined the Catalyst Law Group in San Diego, California, where she headed the corporate legal department. Her practice covers everything from general corporate counseling to legal advice on offshore transactions. She has a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and International Relations from California State University, Hayward. She also earned a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B. with honors) from the University of Wales, Swansea, and a Master of Laws (LL.M.) from Whittier Law School.

This CLE course on Indian gaming & tribal sovereignty is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country. For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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CLE Course on Indian Gaming & Sovereignty

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Since the 1970’s when various Native American tribes took unprecedented actions to initiate gaming enterprises on Indian lands, there have been a series of legal struggles between the federal, state and tribal governments. As Indian gaming has evolved over the years from bingo parlors to high stakes gaming it has also generated controversy on many different levels and disputes have arisen concerning tribal sovereignty, the effects of gaming and a loss of Native American culture. As a result, federal legislation such as the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) has been enacted so the federal government can oversee gaming operations and try to secure collaboration between the states and tribes.

There are currently 566 federally recognized tribes in the United States.[1] Of those 566 tribes, a little over half operate gaming establishments (a.k.a. casinos) and of those casinos, only a handful has found true prosperity in their respective gaming enterprises.

In this course attorney Michele Hannah discusses tribal sovereignty and the regulation of Indian gaming in the United States. Mrs. Hannah mainly addresses how the history of U.S.-tribal relations has set the stage for Indian gaming, why Indian tribes have the “right” to engage in gambling activities, how the federal government has balanced the interests of tribes, the role of federal & state government, the size & impact of Indian gaming and the benefits that Indian gaming provides. To access the course click here: Indian Gaming: Shared Sovereignty & Tribal Self-Government.

Further issues covered include:

  • The definition of a tribe
  • The definition of tribal sovereignty
  • The beginning of the U.S.-tribal relationship
  • The road to Indian gaming
  • Public law 280
  • Key case law
  • The three sovereigns involved
  • The Indian Gaming and Regulatory Act (IGRA)
  • Indian lands
  • The National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC)
  • Class I, II & III gaming
  • Management contracts
  • Per capita distributions
  • Additional regulations
  • Constitutional challenges to Indian gaming

Michele Hannah serves as Deputy General Counsel for the Pechanga Band of Mission Indians. She has a joint degree in law and American Indian Studies from UCLA. Before joining Pechanga’s Office of General Counsel, Mrs. Hannah served as a staff attorney in the Escondido office of California Indian Legal Services for over 5 years. At CILA, her work focused on tribal representation in ICWA cases, estate planning and training under the American Indian Probate Reform Act, cultural resource protection, tribal court development, and gaming and economic development. Mrs. Hannah currently provides general representation to the Pechanga tribal government in all matters and serves as Chair of the Conference Planning Committee.

This CLE course on Indian gaming & tribal sovereignty is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country. For more information about CLE in Illinois please click the following link: IL CLE.

[1] As of January 29, 2014.[1]

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You finally got your client their day in court and the jury has come back with a favorable result for your client. Both you and your client are ecstatic… but how do you collect on that judgment?

While the recent downturn in the economy has made it more difficult for parties to enforce judgments there are still steps you can take to collect the money that is owed to your client.

In this course presented by attorneys Jaime Sheen and Elizabeth Mattis you will learn about a number of available avenues for collecting on a judgment. The main topics addressed include judgment liens on real & personal property, enforcement via writ of execution, special enforcement procedures, property exempt from money judgments, third party claims, enforcement of sister state & foreign judgments and the impact of bankruptcy filing upon judgment.  To access the course click here: Wanted – Debtor Alive: How to Successfully Enforce a Judgment.

Further topics covered include:

  • Key points on judgments
  • The application for the writ of execution
  • Using the sheriff to enforce levies
  • Types of levies (bank, till tap & keeper)
  • The sale of real property
  • The debtor examination
  • Wage garnishment
  • Liens on litigation proceeds
  • Receivers
  • Charging orders
  • Creditor suits
  • Opposing exemptions
  • The homestead exemption
  • Full faith & credit
  • Automatic stays
  • The preference period
  • Notice of appearance & request for special notice
  • Utilizing bankruptcy specialists

Jaime Shean represents individuals and companies in all aspects of general business and commercial litigation, with a specialty in the representation of lenders in the areas of creditors’ rights and bankruptcy litigation. She has litigated in state, federal, and bankruptcy courts on behalf of lending institutions, non-bank lenders and Fortune 500 companies. A substantial portion of her practice also encompasses transactional work, in the documentation of commercial, asset-based and real estate loans and in connection with problem loan workouts. Elizabeth Mattis specializes in real property law, commercial law, secured and unsecured lending, and bankruptcy matters. Her experience includes real property financing transactions, personal property and asset based lending transactions, participated and syndicated transactions, and problem loan workouts. On the litigation side, Ms. Mattis represents individuals and companies in all aspects of general business and commercial litigation, with a specialty in the representation of lenders in the areas of creditors’ rights and bankruptcy litigation. She has litigated in state, federal, and bankruptcy courts on behalf of lending institutions and Fortune 500 companies.

This CLE course is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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CLE Course: Ethics of Cloud Computing

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Welcome to the digital age! The use of cloud computing technologies offers lawyers and law firms alike distinct advantages in terms of cost savings, flexibility & mobility, ease of use and more efficient client service. However, because cloud computing places data – namely confidential client information – on remote servers outside of the lawyer’s direct control, it has given rise to some serious concerns regarding its acceptability under applicable ethics rules. For these reasons, attorneys must be cognizant of their ethical duties when selecting an appropriate vendor and deploying cloud technologies in their practice.

Your law firm would like to take advantage of new technologies like “The Cloud” … but is it safe? How can you be sure you are fulfilling your ethical duties to your client to protect their confidential information?

If you have questions about utilizing cloud technologies in your practice while still maintaining ethical standards of practice then join intellectual property attorney Robert Cogan as he describes what the Cloud is and how you can use this new technology without running afoul of the ethics rules. By taking this course you will reach a basic level of familiarity with what the Cloud is in the context of law practice, be able to identify the ethical obligations that must be met in use of the Cloud, learn the actions the attorney must take in exercising due care when selecting a vendor, recognize significant security vulnerabilities that are not a function of Cloud use and take steps to address these security vulnerabilities. To access the course please click here: Ethics of Cloud Computing.

Additional topics addressed include:

  • Pertinent terms
  • Rules of professional conduct
  • Services
  • SAS
  • Advantages of using the Cloud
  • State ethics opinions
  • ABA opinions & Model Rules
  • Client confidentiality
  • Competence
  • Questions to consider
  • Knowledge requirements for non-technical attorneys
  • Terms of service
  • Practical care
  • Non-technical considerations
  • Social engineering
  • Phishing
  • Trojan horses
  • General guidance

Robert P. Cogan is a business and intellectual property lawyer with over 35 years of experience in both corporate and private practice as well as experience in operating management. His previous experience includes fourteen years as chief patent counsel of a Fortune 200 Company, where he managed the development and enforcement of worldwide patent and trademark portfolios. He has negotiated multimillion dollar agreements, including software licenses, distributorships and joint research projects. Mr. Cogan also has extensive experience in contracting with government agencies including Department of Defense, NASA, and NIH, as well as state agencies.

This CLE course on elder law is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country. For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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CLE Course: Protecting Employer Information

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It is estimated that over 70% of the value of an average business is held within its information systems. With this statistic in mind, it’s not surprising that information can now make the difference between success and failure for a business. For this reason, corporate espionage has become an enormous problem as we have progressed into the Digital Age.

Statistics drawn from various industry sources show that losses due to trade secret thefts are estimated at more than $150 billion a year.

Despite the significant risks that corporate espionage poses, few companies spend the money that is needed to secure and protect their trade secrets from disgruntled employees, and to train their employees to safeguard invaluable company trade secrets. In that regard, companies must pinpoint the specific physical, information technology and other security protocols they can take to safeguard their trade secrets from thieves. And the day is past when trade secrets can be adequately protected simply by requiring employees to execute confidentiality agreements, non-solicitation agreements and covenants not to compete.

Trade secrets and confidential information can be accessed from:

  • File Cabinets
  • Rolodexes
  • Personnel Files
  • Computer Workstations
  • Internet
  • E-Mail
  • Off-Site Login
  • High-Tech Surveillance Equipment
  • Cell Phones/PDAs
  • Fax Machines
  • Garbage

To learn more about how you can counsel companies to more effectively protect valuable trade secrets join Orange County attorney Ron Brand for a detailed discussion of what can be done to protect this invaluable company information. The main topics discussed include corporate espionage, the definition of a trade secrets, how to protect trade secrets and ensuring the enforcement of rights. Mr. Brand also provides thorough analysis of recent trade secrets case law from California and around the country and discusses what Congress is doing to protect trade secrets. To access the course please click here: Protecting Employer Information.

Further issues addressed in this CLE course include:

  • Information technology
  • What thieves are targeting
  • How trade secrets are accessed
  • The types of information that can be a trade secret
  • Security measures
  • Protecting corporate assets
  • Conducting exit interviews
  • Misappropriation of trade secrets
  • Cease & desist letters
  • TROs/preliminary injunctions
  • Monetary damages
  • Non-solicitation & non-compete agreements
  • The CFAA (Computer Fraud and Abuse Act)

Ron S. Brand focuses his practice on providing legal advice, guidance, and representation to employers in all aspects of labor and employment law, including defense against Federal and State-based wrongful termination, retaliation, harassment, discrimination, wage and hour, whistle blower, defamation, breach of contract, fraudulent inducement and other similar claims brought by current and former employees. He represents employers in both Federal and State courts, and before administrative agencies, including the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. He is a frequent speaker for CLE providers, trade groups, associations, and private employers on a wide variety of employment law related issues, including protection of trade secrets and pre-employment background screening.

This CLE course on protecting trade secrets is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country. For more information about CLE in Illinois please click the following link: IL CLE.

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CLE Course: Building the Bridge to Your Elder Law Practice

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Every 10 seconds someone in the United States turns 65 years old. By 2030, it is estimated that over 70 million people in the United States will be 65 years or older – that will be roughly 20% of the population! What does this mean for you?

According to statistics from the 2000 U.S. census, more than 12% of the population in the United States was over the age of 65. That percentage is expected to rise to 20% by the year 2030.

It means that Medicaid and Aid & Attendance planning – the foundations of elder law – can be extremely beneficial to your practice and your aging clients. Advising clients in this area of law is not without pitfalls, however, but it can be a great addition to an established estate planning practice. And even if your practice area is not estate planning, knowing the fundamentals of elder law can help you to fully counsel your aging clients and relatives. In this entry-level course, elder law attorney Richard Scott Stewart provides a thorough overview of elder care law & planning and mainly discusses the history and rules of Medicaid and Aid & Attendance. To access the course click here: Building the Bridge to Your Elder Law Practice.

Further areas covered include:

  • Long-term care facts
  • The origins & evolution of Medicaid
  • The Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act of 1988
  • Alzheimer’s & dementia
  • The Deficit Reduction Act (DRA)
  • Rules for traditional Medicaid coverage
  • Military service requirements for Aid & Attendance
  • The effects of the Affordable Care Act
  • The medically necessary standard
  • Income caps
  • 90 days active service
  • Unreimbursed medical expenses
  • Eligibility for Medicaid
  • Look back periods
  • Planning for in-home care
  • Planning for skilled nursing care
  • The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) of 1993
  • Recovery avoidance solutions
  • IRAs
  • Applying for both Medicaid and Aid & Attendance benefits

Richard Scott Stewart has concentrated his law practice on Medicaid, Medi-Cal benefit law, estate planning and asset protection and retention. He is a member of the California Bar Association, San Diego County Bar Association, California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, and the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. He has appeared as a regular guest on the Lawyer in Blue Jeans radio show and conducts seminars and workshops on elder law topics in Southern California for caregiver support groups including the Southern Caregiver Resource Association, the Parkinson’s Disease Association, and the Alzheimer’s Association. He is also a frequent lecturer on various Elder Law topics around San Diego and Southern California.

This CLE course on elder law is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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Washington CLE Deadline is December 31

screen-capture-1Attorneys in Washington have one of the larger continuing legal education requirements. The good thing is that Washington attorneys have three years to complete the mandatory CLE requirement. Attorneys in Washington must complete at least 45 CLE units every three years in order to meet the Washington minimum continuing legal education (MCLE) requirement. As part of the 45 unit WA MCLE requirement, attorneys must also complete a minimum of 6 credit hours of Legal Ethics or Professional Responsibility.

Washington MCLE Compliance Requirements

  • Reporting Cycle: 3 years
  • Compliance Deadline: December 31
  • Reporting Deadline:  January 31

You must have all of your Washington CLE completed before December 31 if this is your compliance year. And your WA CLE compliance must be reported by January 31, 2015. Washington attorneys may complete at least a portion of their WA MCLE requirement through online WA CLE courses. Lawyers in Washington may satisfy up to 22.5 credits of the required 45 CLE requirements through online and downloadable CLE courses. Online and downloadable CLE courses are considered self-study according to the Washington MCLE Rules.

Mandatory Continuing Legal Education[1]

APR 11 requires that active members (including military lawyers, foreign house counsel, and administrative law judges) complete a minimum of 45 hours of approved continuing legal education activities in each 3-year reporting period. At least 22.5 credits must be live and 6 must be ethics. Failure to comply with the MCLE requirements will result in suspension.

Don’t wait until December 30 to get started on your WA CLE! Attorney Credits features both online and offline CLE courses for Washington attorneys to complete CLE in the office, at home on on-the-go. We also offer MP3 Players and USB compliance packages that come pre-loaded with 22.5 WA CLE credit hours. Click here for more information about CLE in Washington: WA CLE.

[1] http://www.wsba.org/Licensing-and-Lawyer-Conduct/MCLE

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