Most Popular Non-Immigrant Employee Visas

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Nonimmigrant visas allow companies in the United States to take advantage of the worldwide talent pool by bringing the best employees from overseas to work here for a temporary period of time.  The non-immigrant visa permits the person to travel to the United States during the validity of the visa to accomplish a specific purpose such as visiting, studying or working in a specialty job.  Individuals who are traveling to the U.S. for a temporary purpose are classified as non-immigrants under United States law.

A non-immigrant visa is often utilized by an investor, a professional such as an engineer or specialty worker such as an athlete or entertainer.

In this new CLE course, immigration attorneys Amy Ghosh and William Levings provide a broad review of the most popular types of non-immigrant employee visas utilized by U.S. employers.  The following types of visas are discussed in the program: E-1, E-2, O, P and L-1.  The presenters also provide numerous practical considerations and practice points when clients are seeking to apply for the various types of visas.  To access the course click here: Most Popular Non-Immigrant Employee Visas.

Further topics discussed include:

  • The eligibility requirements that must be met for each visa
  • Similarities & differences between the 4 types of visas
  • Advantages & disadvantages of the four types of visas
  • The “substantial trade” & “principally between US and treaty nation” provisions of the E-1 visa
  • The nationalities that qualify for the E-2 investor visa
  • The definition of an athlete & entertainer for P-1 visas
  • P-2 Visas & Participants in Reciprocal Exchange Programs
  • P-3 Visas & Culturally Unique Groups
  • The use of L-1 visas by multi-national companies
  • L-1 visas & intracompany transfers
  • The L-1 blanket visa
  • Specific requirements for the L-1 employer & employee
  • Additional requirements for new offices under the L-1 visa & EB-1C category considerations
  • Gaining lawful permanent resident status

Amy Ghosh has years of success conducting deportation defense and asylum cases before the Immigration Court, and also handles H1B visa, Labor Certification, Naturalization, Citizenship, and other immigration processes.  In addition, she has trial and appellate experience in civil and family law cases. William F. Levings specializes in immigration law and has prevented many immigrants from being forcibly removed from the United States.  In addition to removal defense, Mr. Levings has also obtained permanent residence and citizenship for a number of clients.  He has successfully represented immigrants requiring Form I-601A waivers at U.S. Consulates around the world.  His emphasis is on EB-5 Investor Visas and he also represents clients seeking L-1, E-2, and H1-B visas.

This CLE course on the most popular non-immigrant employee visas is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country.  For more information about CLE in Illinois please click the following link: IL CLE.

CLE Course: Common Sense Rules of Trial Advocacy

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With so much at stake in today’s trials, trial attorneys must constantly refine their craft and hone their trial skills to achieve the best result for their clients at trial. From selecting your jury to delivering your final argument almost every tactical decision you make and deploy in the courtroom can affect the outcome of the case – even something as simple as where you stand in the courtroom.

“Common sense is very uncommon.” – Mark Twain

In this excellent new CLE course, trial attorney Roy Comer shares his thirty years of legal and trial experience with you by providing his thirty-two common sense rules of trial advocacy.  The main areas covered include basic & universal rules of trial practice, jury selection, opening statements, direct examination, cross examination and the final argument.  The course can be accessed by clicking the following link: Common Sense Rules of Trial Advocacy.

The rules discussed by Mr. Comer include:

  • Showing the jury the way home
  • Sticking to the truth
  • Looking like a lawyer
  • Not sounding like a lawyer
  • Using persuasion aids
  • Deselecting a jury
  • Listening more & talking less
  • Thinking big principle
  • Thinking story
  • The importance of simplicity & brevity
  • Sticking to the facts
  • Stating enough facts to justify the verdict
  • Preparing the jury for the boring bits
  • Laying a proper foundation
  • Not expecting the fact finder to believe the unbelievable
  • Embracing & dealing with the weak points in your case
  • Planning your movement within the courtroom
  • Listening intently
  • Keeping objections to a minimum
  • Varying the style of your questions
  • Controlling the witness
  • Stopping when you’ve accomplished your goals on cross
  • The perils of demanding “yes” or “no” answers from witnesses
  • Pinning down the witness before impeachment
  • Avoiding fishing expeditions
  • Never asking “Why?” and never asking “How?”
  • Arming your favorable jurors
  • Using emotion with caution
  • Clarify but don’t rebut during the final argument

For over thirty years Roy L. Comer has handled damage cases, including catastrophic personal injury and wrongful death cases arising from automobile, truck, motorcycle, medical negligence, defective products, and dangerous premises claims.  In addition, Mr. Comer has represented individuals and medium-sized businesses in real estate, landlord-tenant, insurance and contract disputes.  Defending these types of claims has provided Mr. Comer with further insight into how insurance companies approach and litigate these claims.  Mr. Comer’s clients depend on his experience, coupled with the highest legal, professional and empathic standards.

This CLE course on common sense rules of trial advocacy is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

 Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country.  For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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VA CLE: VA CLE Deadline is October 31

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Attorneys licensed to practice in Virginia must complete at least 12 VA CLE credit hours each annual CLE compliance period.  As part of the 12 credit hour VA CLE requirement at least 2 credit hours must be earned in the area of legal ethics or professionalism.  Virginia recently amended its CLE Rules and at least 4 of the 12 required VA CLE credit hours must now be completed through live, interactive VA CLE programs.

Virginia CLE Compliance & Reporting Requirement

  • Reporting Cycle: Annual
  • Compliance Deadline: October 31
  • Reporting Deadline: December 15 

 

Virginia attorneys must complete the required 12 credit hours of Virginia CLE by October 31.  Virginia is a self-reporting CLE state and attorneys must report completion of the VA CLE requirement by December 15 to avoid fines.  To report VA CLE credit, Virginia attorneys can choose to report compliance via regular mail and attorneys may also report online through the Virginia Bar website.[1]

Certifying Your MCLE Attendance[2]

You may certify your attendance online with the required information or you must MAIL your Form 1, End of Year Report with any amendments and certification forms to the MCLE office.

If you fail to properly complete the 12 required VA CLE credit hours by October 31 you will be assessed a $100 non-compliance fee.  Failing to report your VA CLE compliance by the December 15 VA compliance reporting deadline will result in another $100 late filing fee.  For more information about CLE in Virginia please click here: VA CLE.

[1] This online certification of attendance function with the VA Bar may be used for CLE courses where you have received from the course sponsor a certification of attendance form which includes the Virginia course ID number.

http://www.vsb.org/site/members/certifying-your-mcle-attendance

[2] http://www.vsb.org/site/members/certifying-your-mcle-attendance

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Utah CLE: 24 Credit Hours Every 2 Years

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Utah attorneys that are on active status are required to complete at least 24 hours of approved UT CLE every two years, including a minimum of three hours of accredited legal ethics.  In Utah, 1 of the 3 required legal ethics hours must be in the area of professionalism and civility.

Utah CLE Compliance & Reporting Requirements

  • Reporting Cycle: 2 years
  • Compliance Deadline: June 30
  • Reporting Deadline: July 31

Attorneys whose UT CLE compliance is due must complete the UT CLE requirement by June 30.[1]  Your UT CLE compliance must be reported by July 31.  If your UT CLE requirement is not completed by June 30 or reported by July 31 there is a $100 late filing fee.

Self-study Utah CLE courses include audio and video presentations, computer interactive telephonic programs, writing and publishing an article in a legal periodical, part-time teaching by a lawyer in an approved law school, or presenting a paper or speech on a professional subject at a meeting primarily attended by lawyers, legal assistants or law students. The number of hours of UT CLE credit that will be allowed for self-study activities and the procedures for obtaining such UT CLE credit will be determined specifically in particular instances by the Utah CLE Board.[2]

Online UT CLE courses are considered self-study CLE in Utah.  Utah attorneys are limited to 12 online CLE credits of the 24 required by the Utah MCLE Rules.  All of Attorney Credits Utah CLE courses have been pre-approved for CLE credit by the Utah CLE Board.  For more information about CLE in Utah, please click the following link: UT CLE.

[1] Utah attorneys have either even year or odd year compliance groups.

[2] Rule 14-404. Active status lawyers: MCLE, NLTP and admission on motion requirements.

http://www.utcourts.gov/resources/rules/ucja/ch14/04%20mcle/usb14-404.html

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Tennessee CLE FAQ

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Do you have questions about your Tennessee CLE requirement?  Do you need to know how to report your Tennessee CLE compliance – or how many ethics and professionalism (E/P) credits you need each annual compliance period?  Do you need to know how many online TN CLE courses you can take you can take each year?

 Tennessee CLE Compliance & Reporting Requirements

  • Reporting Cycle: Annual
  • Compliance Deadline: December 31
  • Reporting Deadline: March 1

Well, we have created a TN CLE FAQ to answer all your pressing Tennessee CLE questions.  Now you can easily find the answers that you need to all of your TN CLE questions without having to search all around the Web.  We have listed everything from the amount of credit you are allowed to carry over to what happens if you are in non-compliance with your TN CLE requirement!

Top Tennessee CLE Questions

What are the mandatory CLE requirements in Tennessee?

  • Tennessee attorneys must complete at minimum of 15 TN CLE credit hours each annual TN CLE compliance period – including 3 hours of Ethics/Professionalism (E/P).

How many online Tennessee CLE courses can I take through Attorney Credits?

  • Attorneys admitted to the Tennessee Bar Association are allowed complete a maximum of eight (8) TN CLE credit hours through on-demand online TN CLE courses each annual TN compliance period. 

When must I complete and report my TN CLE?

  • All TN CLE credit hours must be completed by December 31.  TN CLE compliance must be reported no later than March 1.

Does the Tennessee Bar Association keep a record of my completed CLE activities?

  • Yes. On or before January 31 of each year, the TN CLE Commission will prepare and mail an Annual Report Statement (ARS) to each Tennessee attorney.  The ARS will list information regarding TN CLE completed in the preceding calendar year.

How do I report my Tennessee CLE compliance?

  • The TN CLE Commission will mail an Annual Report Statement (ARS) to each Tennessee attorney.  The ARS will request information regarding your completion of TN CLE in the preceding TN CLE compliance year.  By March 1, Tennessee attorneys must complete the ARS.  The completed ARS will disclose all TN CLE hours earned during the preceding TN CLE compliance year.  Tennessee attorneys whose ARS is in compliance with the Tennessee CLE Rules (and whose fees have been paid) are exempt from delivering the ARS to the Tennessee CLE Commission.

Who can I contact for more information about TN CLE?

  • For more information about CLE in Tennessee, please call the Tennessee Commission on Continuing Legal Education and Specialization at (615) 741 – 3096.  You may also contact Attorney Credits support via email or telephone.  For further assistance and information, please call our Support Center at 877-910-MCLE (6253) or visit the support page on the website.

We hope that this saves you time and keeps you compliant with your TN CLE requirement.  If you have further questions, you can visit our full Tennessee CLE FAQ.  And if you need to complete your TN CLE requirement, please visit our TN CLE webpage: TN CLE.

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PA CLE: Group II CLE Compliance is August 31

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Pennsylvania attorneys can expect some changes to the PA CLE requirement for 2015 … but for attorneys with 2014 compliance dates things will remain the same for now.  For 2014 compliance dates, attorneys in the Keystone State must complete 12 PA CLE credit hours to fulfill the Pennsylvania continuing legal education (PA CLE) requirement.  Pennsylvania attorneys must also complete at least 1 hour of legal ethics, professionalism or substance abuse as part of the 12 unit PA CLE requirement.  This will go up to 2 credit hours of legal ethics in 2015.

The public properly expects that lawyers, in the practice of law, will maintain certain standards of professional competence and ethical behavior. The requirement for continuing legal education was established to ensure that, throughout their careers, lawyers admitted to practice in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania remain current regarding the law and maintain the requisite knowledge and skill necessary to fulfill their professional responsibilities.[1]

For compliance purposes, Pennsylvania attorneys are assigned to three separate PA CLE compliance groups.  And once a Pennsylvania attorney is assigned to one of the three compliance groups, the compliance group will never change even if the last name changes.  Attorneys in PA CLE Compliance Group 2 are required to complete the Pennsylvania CLE requirement by August 31, 2014.

All PA lawyers are assigned to 1 of 3 PA CLE Compliance Groups:

  • Group I:    May 1 – April 30
  • Group II:   September 1 – August 31
  • Group III:  January 1 – December 31

PA CLE groups are chosen randomly by lawyer ID number.

Pennsylvania attorneys with 2014 compliance dates may currently complete 4 credit hours through online PA CLE courses each compliance period.  For 2015 PA CLE compliance, attorneys will be able to complete 6 online credit hours.  For more information about CLE in Pennsylvania, please click the following link: PA CLE.

[1] Lawyer FAQ

https://www.pacle.org/forms/PF_Lawyer_QA.asp

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Oregon CLE: 45 Credit Hours by December 31

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Oregon attorneys have one of the larger CLE requirements in the country.  Attorneys that are licensed to practice in Oregon must complete 45 OR CLE credit hours every 3 years in order to remain in compliance with the OR MCLE requirement.  That means that Oregon attorneys should take an average of around 15 credit hours every year in order to stay on pace with completing the 45 hour requirement.

Oregon CLE Compliance & Reporting

  • Reporting Cycle: Every 3 years
  • Compliance Deadline: December 31
  • Reporting Deadline: January 31

Oregon attorneys must also complete a number of specialty credits as part of the 45 credit hour OR CLE requirement.  At least 6 of the 45 required OR CLE credit hours must be in CLE activities accredited for legal ethics or professional responsibility.[1]  In addition, 1 of the 6 required ethics credit hours must pertain to a lawyer’s statutory child abuse reporting obligations.  And in alternate OR CLE reporting periods, at least 3 of the required 45 hours must be in programs accredited for Access to Justice credit pursuant to Rule 5.5(b).

(b) In order to be accredited as an activity pertaining to access to justice … an activity shall be directly related to the practice of law and designed to educate attorneys to identify and eliminate from the legal profession and from the practice of law barriers to access to justice arising from biases against persons because of race, gender, economic status, creed, color, religion, national origin, disability, age or sexual orientation.

Oregon attorneys have the option of completing all 45 required OR CLE credit hours through Attorney Credits’ online and downloadable CLE courses.  Attorney Credits offers full 45 unit OR CLE compliance packages and individual OR CLE courses, including a wide selection of CLE courses pertaining to legal ethics, access to justice and the mandatory child abuse reporting duty in Oregon.

For more information about CLE in Oregon please click here: OR CLE.

[1] This includes legal ethics and professionalism CLE courses and CLE programs relating to the role of lawyers concerning gender fairness, racial & ethnic issues and disability issues.

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Oklahoma CLE: 12 Credit Hours Annually

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Each year members of the Oklahoma Bar must complete at least 12 Oklahoma CLE credit hours to fulfill the annual OK CLE requirement.  As part of the OK CLE requirement, at least 1 of the 12 CLE credit hours must be approved for legal ethics.[1]  All OK CLE courses must be completed by December 31 and OK CLE compliance must be reported by February 15.

Oklahoma CLE Compliance & Reporting Requirements

  • Reporting Cycle: Annual
  • Compliance Deadline: December 31
  • Reporting Deadline: February 15

Oklahoma attorneys have the option of completing a portion of the OK CLE requirement through online and downloadable CLE courses.  However, no more than 6 of the 12 required OK CLE credits can be earned by completing approved online, on-demand CLE courses.  Attorneys in Oklahoma may complete courses by streaming video, MP3 download and Video Download.

Failing to Report CLE Compliance

Failure to report the required approved CLE credits or failure to report one of the allowed exemptions could result in non-compliance fees ranging from $100 to $700.

If you have completed your required OK CLE hours by December 31 you no longer have to file an Annual Report of Compliance with the Oklahoma Bar Association MCLE Commission. However, if you do not have sufficient CLE units to meet your OK MCLE requirement, then you must file an Annual Report of Compliance. It is the responsibility of each OK bar member to review the accuracy of the Oklahoma Bar Association records and reports, and ensure that CLE compliance is recognized by the MCLE Commission.

For more information about CLE in Oklahoma please click here: OK CLE.

[1] A minimum of one credit hour must be in the area of professional responsibility, legal ethics or legal malpractice prevention.

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Ohio CLE: OH CLE Compliance Groups

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Attorneys in Ohio must complete 24 CLE units every two years to fulfill the Ohio CLE (continuing legal education) requirement.  Ohio attorneys must also complete the Professional Conduct requirement every two years.  To complete the Ohio Professional Conduct requirement, attorneys must complete a minimum of 2.5 credit hours of Substance Abuse, Legal Ethics and Professionalism.

OH CLE Compliance & Reporting Requirements

  • Reporting Cycle: Every 2 years
  • Compliance Deadline: December 31
  • Reporting Deadline: January 31

However, the Ohio CLE requirement is not annual.  Ohio attorneys must complete the required 24 credit hours every two years and all attorneys have been permanently assigned to one of two groups based on the first letter of their last name.  Attorneys whose last name begins with A – L must complete the OH CLE requirement on or before December 31 of each ODD numbered year.  Attorneys whose last name begins with M – Z must complete the OH CLE requirement on or before December 31 of each EVEN numbered year.

OH CLE Compliance Groups

  • Last name A – L: Report by 1/31 of EVEN numbered years
  • Last name M – Z: Report by 1/31 of ODD numbered years

The OH CLE compliance deadline is December 31 and the OH CLE reporting deadline is January 31.  Under the 2014 amendments to the OH CLE Rules Ohio attorneys may satisfy up to twelve (12) credit hours of their OH CLE requirements through online OH CLE courses.  For more information about CLE in Ohio please click the following link: OH CLE.

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CLE Course: Tax Issues Regarding Service & Property Contributions to LLCs & Corporations

In this new CLE course tax attorney and expert Michael Shaff provides analysis on the tax issues relating to contributions of services and property to LLCs and corporations.

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The main issues discussed in this CLE course include general rules on the contribution of property to LLCs & other entities taxed as partnerships, the general rules on the contribution of property to corporations, the rules on the issuance of equity or other property for services, examples when a C corporation may be more beneficial and the exclusion from recognition of gain on the disposition of the stock of a qualified small business.  The course can be accessed by clicking the following link: Tax Issues Relating to Contributions of Services and Property to LLCs and Corporations.

Further areas addressed by Mr. Shaff include:

  • Pass-through treatment
  • The investment company rule
  • Section 752 (deemed distributions on contributions of property)
  • The “bottom guaranty”
  • Treasury Regulation §1.707-3 (disguised sale treatment)
  • Section 351 (tax contributors “in control”)
  • The UPREIT example
  • The incorporation of a partnership followed by use of the reorganization provision
  • S and C corporations
  • Section 83 (issuance of property for services)
  • Section 409A (nonqualified stock options)
  • Revenue Procedure 93-27
  • Section 1045 (rollover of gain on the sale of qualified small business “QSB” stock)
  • The definition of a QSB

Michael E. Shaff specializes in all aspects of federal income taxation and is co-author of the “Real Estate Investment Trusts Handbook” published by WestGroup.  Mr. Shaff’s practice encompasses all aspects of REIT taxation, related finance transactions & debt and equity offerings.  Mr. Shaff served as a trial attorney with the office of the Chief Counsel of the Internal Revenue Service for three years and is certified by the Board of Legal Specialization of the State Bar of California as a specialist in tax law.  He is a member of the State Bar of California (Trusts and Estates Section), and both the Massachusetts and New York bar associations.  Mr. Shaff is also the past chair of the Tax Section of the Orange County Bar Association (OCBA).

This CLE course on tax issues relating to contributions of services and property to LLCs and corporations is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country.  For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.