Category Archives: Ethics & Professionalism

CLE Course: Ethics of Cloud Computing

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Welcome to the digital age! The use of cloud computing technologies offers lawyers and law firms alike distinct advantages in terms of cost savings, flexibility & mobility, ease of use and more efficient client service. However, because cloud computing places data – namely confidential client information – on remote servers outside of the lawyer’s direct control, it has given rise to some serious concerns regarding its acceptability under applicable ethics rules. For these reasons, attorneys must be cognizant of their ethical duties when selecting an appropriate vendor and deploying cloud technologies in their practice.

Your law firm would like to take advantage of new technologies like “The Cloud” … but is it safe? How can you be sure you are fulfilling your ethical duties to your client to protect their confidential information?

If you have questions about utilizing cloud technologies in your practice while still maintaining ethical standards of practice then join intellectual property attorney Robert Cogan as he describes what the Cloud is and how you can use this new technology without running afoul of the ethics rules. By taking this course you will reach a basic level of familiarity with what the Cloud is in the context of law practice, be able to identify the ethical obligations that must be met in use of the Cloud, learn the actions the attorney must take in exercising due care when selecting a vendor, recognize significant security vulnerabilities that are not a function of Cloud use and take steps to address these security vulnerabilities. To access the course please click here: Ethics of Cloud Computing.

Additional topics addressed include:

  • Pertinent terms
  • Rules of professional conduct
  • Services
  • SAS
  • Advantages of using the Cloud
  • State ethics opinions
  • ABA opinions & Model Rules
  • Client confidentiality
  • Competence
  • Questions to consider
  • Knowledge requirements for non-technical attorneys
  • Terms of service
  • Practical care
  • Non-technical considerations
  • Social engineering
  • Phishing
  • Trojan horses
  • General guidance

Robert P. Cogan is a business and intellectual property lawyer with over 35 years of experience in both corporate and private practice as well as experience in operating management. His previous experience includes fourteen years as chief patent counsel of a Fortune 200 Company, where he managed the development and enforcement of worldwide patent and trademark portfolios. He has negotiated multimillion dollar agreements, including software licenses, distributorships and joint research projects. Mr. Cogan also has extensive experience in contracting with government agencies including Department of Defense, NASA, and NIH, as well as state agencies.

This CLE course on elder law is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country. For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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CLE Course: Online Security & Risk Basics for Attorneys

We now live in the digital era – an era of social media, mobile phones & devices and being connected and online 24/7. There are many benefits for attorneys and law firms that adopt and utilize online technology to enhance their practice and provide more cost-effective and efficient service to their clients. Unfortunately, there are numerous risks that are involved with utilizing online technologies as well.

“Which risks are relevant?  Those that impact business goals.  Which risks impact business goals?  They all do.” – Deborah Gonzalez

In this new CLE course, Deborah Gonzales of Law2SM presents the tools and resources that you need to better understand the security and reputational risks of online and digital activity for attorneys and how to mitigate those risks to minimize potential losses. The focus of Online Security & Risk Basics for Attorneys is to present security and risk management best practices that address major concerns for attorneys in our new online environment.

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There is a wealth of practical information presented in this course and Ms. Gonzalez provides numerous practice points for attorneys to adopt in their everyday practice to minimize online risks.  The main topics addressed include setting the context of our new digital world, mobile devices, apps & BYOD, reputational risk, big data, content management/marketing, compliance and what you can do to mitigate your risk.

Further issues addressed in this CLE course include:

  • The relevant risks
  • Digital threats
  • Social media/online risk
  • Online security
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Sources of risk
  • Why risks happen
  • Crafting a social media policy
  • The NLRB’s (National Labor Relations Board) role in regulation
  • The 5 C’s
  • Monitoring risks
  • Suggested alerts
  • Metadata/geo-tagging
  • Protecting your online identity
  • Compliance with rules & regulations
  • The SEC regulations
  • FTC & compliance
  • Disclaimers
  • The FCC & net neutrality
  • COPPA (Children’s’ Online Privacy Protection Act)
  • The compliance toolkit
  • Audits & assessment
  • SLA™ Risk Assessment
  • Protecting yourself and your firm through insurance coverage

The founder of Law2SM, Deborah Gonzalez is an attorney whose legal practice focuses on music, art, entertainment, digital, social media and online law. She obtained her JD from New York Law School and is licensed to practice in both New York and in Georgia. Her clients include galleries, museums, artists & art professionals, animators, filmmakers, musicians & music professionals, authors, and various other creative professionals. Ms. Gonzalez is a member of the Georgia Production Partnership, Georgia Entertainment Association, Women in Animation, and the Entertainment Law sections of the Georgia and New York Sate Bar Associations. She speaks at various industry conferences around the world, such as SEIGE CON and SIAF, on legal issues and concerns for artists of all genres.  Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country. To access more information about Illinois CLE please click the following link: IL CLE:

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The Neuroscience of Addiction: Attorney as Patient

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Historically, addiction has been attributed to a lack of self-control or will power.  However, science has proven that this is not the case.  Many individuals, with the self-control and will power to complete law school, run a successful company or become a professional athlete succumb to the ills of addiction.  And lawyers are no strangers to addiction – substance abuse and addiction rates inside the legal profession are twice as high as the general population.  The legal profession is full of conflict and is very stressful and lawyers learn to develop a tough exterior and repress weakness to deal with this conflict and stress.

“Giving up smoking is easy. I’ve done it hundreds of times.”

In this highly informative course on the neuroscience of substance abuse and addiction Dr. Lavid defines addiction, discusses the link between genetics, addiction & the brain, and addresses treatment options with a focus on the attorney.  To access the course please click here: The Neuroscience of Addiction: Attorney as Patient.  The course qualifies for substance abuse or legal ethics credit in many states.

Dr. Lavid also touches on a number of additional topics including:

  • The DSM-5 definition of addiction
  • The clinical course of addiction
  • Genetic vulnerability
  • The inherent addiction of substance abuse
  • Alcohol
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Brain function in addiction
  • The nucleas accumbens
  • Medical treatment
  • Medicines that target addiction including bupropion & naltrexone
  • Why attorneys are especially at risk
  • Lawyers & stress
  • Medical evaluation
  • Intervention
  • Treatment
  • The Lawyer Assistance Program (LAP)
  • The Other Bar
  • The Alternative Discipline Program (ADP)
  • Statistics on the LAP

Dr. Nathan E. Lavid practices clinical and forensic psychiatry in Long Beach, California, where he operates his own private practice.  Dr. Lavid’s practice is dedicated to providing care for patients and forensic clients that incorporate the latest findings from neuroscience research.  Dr. Lavid is also accepted as an expert by numerous state and federal courts around the country. He engages a variety of civil, criminal, family and probate law matters including addiction, child and adolescent/custody, competency to stand trial and for decision-making, civil commitment, diminished intent, fitness for duty, harassment, immigration, insanity, placement, psychiatric and psychological autopsy, psychiatric disability/damages, psychiatric evaluation for treatment, psychopharmacology, and restoration of competency & sanity.

This CLE course on the neuroscience of addiction is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New Jersey and around the country.  For more information about CLE in New Jersey please click the following link: NJ CLE.

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NY CLE: 4 Credit Hours of Legal Ethics

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New York has different CLE rules for experienced attorneys and attorneys that are newly admitted to the New York State Bar.[1]  If you are an experienced New York attorney you must complete a minimum of 24 NY CLE credit hours during each two-year reporting period.[2]  According to the NY CLE Rules, an “experienced” New York attorney is an attorney that has been admitted to the New York Bar for more than two years.

NY CLE Requirements — Experienced Attorneys

  • NY CLE Credits Required: 24
  • Reporting Cycle: 2 years
  • Compliance Deadline: Date of Birth
  • Reporting Deadline: 30 days after your birthday

Experienced attorneys in New York do have a specialty unit requirement.  Experienced attorneys must complete ethics courses to properly fulfill their NY CLE requirement.  As part of the NY CLE requirement experienced attorneys must complete 4 credit hours of Ethics and Professionalism every two years.  Ethics is widely construed and includes courses on substance abuse and “the promotion of fairness, justice and morality” in the legal profession.

(c) Ethics and Professionalism may include, among other things, the following: the norms relating to lawyers’ professional obligations to clients (including the obligation to provide legal assistance to those in need, confidentiality, competence, conflicts of interest, the allocation of decision making, and zealous advocacy and its limits); the norms relating to lawyers’ professional relations with prospective clients, courts and other legal institutions, and third parties (including the lawyers’ fiduciary, accounting and record-keeping obligations when entrusted with law client and escrow monies, as well as the norms relating to civility); the sources of lawyers’ professional obligations (including disciplinary rules, judicial decisions, and relevant constitutional and statutory provisions); recognition and resolution of ethical dilemmas; the mechanisms for enforcing professional norms; substance abuse control; and professional values (including professional development, improving the profession, and the promotion of fairness, justice and morality).[3]

If you need ethics or general CLE in New York we have you covered.  Attorney Credits is an Accredited Sponsor of CLE in New York and we have numerous courses on ethics, substance abuse and eliminating bias in the legal profession that qualify for ethics credit in New York.  For more information about the mandatory New York CLE requirement, please click here NY CLE.

[1] Attorneys that are newly admitted to the New York State Bar Association must complete a minimum of 16 “transitional” NY CLE credit hours in each of the first two years of admission for a total of thirty-two (32) CLE credit hours.  16 of those credit hours must be in the following areas: Skills, Ethics and Professionalism & Law Practice Management and/or Areas of Professional Practice. The first set of 16 transitional NY CLE credit hours must be completed by the first anniversary of admission to the New York Bar Association in the designated categories of credit. The second set of 16 transitional CLE credit hours must be completed between the 1st and 2nd anniversaries of admission to the New York State Bar.

[2] The two-year reporting cycle is defined as the two-year period between your attorney registrations.

[3] New York CLE Rules

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CLE Course: Basics of Conflicts of Interest

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Penalties for conflict of interest violations are severe and range from disqualification to disgorgement of fees.  However, despite the fundamental nature of conflicts and waivers, they still continue to plague many attorneys and continue to be a source of ethical and malpractice liability.  And conflicts of interest have only become a greater concern as increasingly more attorneys are changing firms and the corporate ‘client’ becomes harder to identify.

The ethical issues that are most fundamental to many attorneys in their practices involve conflicts of interest.

If you need to brush up on the fundamentals of conflicts of interest then join attorney Robert Kehr as he provides an overview of the main concepts of avoiding actual and potential conflicts in your practice.  The main areas addressed include the source of ethical conflict rules, ethical resources, the purpose of the Rules of Professional Conduct, the definition of a conflict of interest, the duties that a lawyer owes to the client, the basic conflicts rule, specific conflicts and giving the client informed consent of the conflict.  To access the course click here: Conflicts of Interest: The Basics.

Further issues addressed include:

  • The ABA Model Rules
  • Ethics opinions
  • Disqualification
  • Disciplinary proceedings
  • Fiduciary duties
  • Standards of civil conduct
  • Potential conflicts
  • Actual conflicts
  • The four major duties that a lawyer owes to a client
  • Model Rule 1.7(a)(1)
  • Examples of conflicts
  • Common examples of direct adversity
  • Model Rule 1.7(a)(2) & material limitation
  • The comments to the conflict rules
  • Competence
  • Full & unbiased disclosure
  • Confidentiality
  • Undivided loyalty to the client
  • Full disclosure to the client
  • Joint representation of clients
  • The importance of conflict letters
  • Revoking consent

Robert L. Kehr is a principal with Kehr, Schiff & Crane, LLP, in Los Angeles, where his practice includes business and real estate transactions and expert testimony on legal ethics.  He is a former chair and continuing member of the Los Angeles County Bar Association Committee on Professional Responsibility and Ethics and the current chair of the State Bar of California Committee on Professional Responsibility and Conduct.

This CLE course on conflicts of interest is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country.  For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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CLE Course: Ethical Advice from a Trial Lawyer

gg-smilingTrial attorney Gary Gwilliam shares with you his ethical advice for maintaining an ethical practice. Gary has been an attorney since 1963 and is considered one of the best consumer trial attorneys in the state of California. Over the course of his legal carreer he has tried over 180 jury cases, of which more than 100 were personal injury cases. He has handled major cases in every area of consumer law – including serious automobile and construction accidents, products liability, medical malpractice, bad faith insurance, civil rights, wrongful termination and employment discrimination.

Many, if not most, trial lawyers have such a deep-seated fear of losing that it becomes almost impossible to acknowledge that emotion. It is a dark shadow within us that we don’t want to face. The fear of losing is really the fear of failure. And failure is embarrassing and shameful. It brings up childhood memories that are often too overwhelming to face.  – Gary Gwilliam

In this course, Gary provides insight from his lengthy career as a trial attorney and shares advice on ways how to remain ethical in your own practice. The main topics discussed include how lawyers get into ethical problems, stress & the ethical demands of practicing law, substance abuse & legal ethics, the importance of winning & practicing ethically and achieving balance in our practices.  To access the course please click here: Ethical Advice from a Trial Lawyer.

Further topics discussed include:

  • How attorneys can practice with integrity
  • Avoiding state bar discipline
  • Avoiding putting self interest above the client’s interest
  • How to treat loses as challenges & opportunities for growth
  • The fiduciary relationship with the client
  • Conflict & the legal profession how substance abuse affects your judgment
  • Dealing with workaholism
  • Getting out of balance due to work issues
  • Taking care of yourself to practice ethically
  • Relationships
  • What it’s like to be a lawyer
  • Aging

Gary is a former president of the Consumer Attorneys of California and was nominated Trial Lawyer of the Year in 1995 and 1996 by the Trial Lawyers for Public Justice. Gary is also a recipient 2001 of the California Lawyer Attorney of the Year Award for employment law. A noted lecturer and motivational speaker, he has conducted seminars and workshops around California and the United States for many years. His ethics seminar, “How to Get a Winning Verdict in Your Personal Life,” won him a Consumer Attorneys of California Presidential Award in 1994. He is the author of numerous articles on California consumer law and is frequently called upon to serve as an expert witness on the standard of care for lawyers’ conduct. Recipient of the Public Justice Foundation’s Champion of Justice Award 2009, Gary Gwilliam mentors attorneys on such challenges as alcoholism, stress, work/life balance, and dealing with losses.

This CLE course on remaining ethical in your practice is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country.  For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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NY CLE: 4 Credit Hours of Legal Ethics

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Attorneys licensed in New York that are considered ‘experienced’ attorneys must complete at least 24 credit hours of approved New York CLE (Continuing Legal Education) each compliance period.[1]  The biennial compliance period is considered the two-year period between attorney registrations.

New York CLE Compliance Requirements

  • Reporting Cycle: 2 years
  • Compliance Deadline: Birth date
  • Reporting Deadline: 30 days after your birthday

As part of the NY CLE requirement, New York attorneys must also complete 4 credit hours of Ethics and Professionalism each compliance period as part of the 24 credit hours. This is a wide category of credit and many types of ethics, professionalism and substance abuse CLE courses count for this type of credit. New York attorneys may complete online and downloadable CLE courses to fulfill the 4 credit hour legal ethics requirement.

§ 1500.2 Definitions[2]

(c) Ethics and Professionalism may include, among other things, the following: the norms relating to lawyers’ professional obligations to clients (including the obligation to provide legal assistance to those in need, confidentiality, competence, conflicts of interest, the allocation of decision making, and zealous advocacy and its limits); the norms relating to lawyers’ professional relations with prospective clients, courts and other legal institutions, and third parties (including the lawyers’ fiduciary, accounting and record-keeping obligations when entrusted with law client and escrow monies, as well as the norms relating to civility); the sources of lawyers’ professional obligations (including disciplinary rules, judicial decisions, and relevant constitutional and statutory provisions); recognition and resolution of ethical dilemmas; the mechanisms for enforcing professional norms; substance abuse control; and professional values (including professional development, improving the profession, and the promotion of fairness, justice and morality).

Attorney Credits offers a wide selection of legal ethics courses for New York attorneys.  We offer streaming video courses and we also feature downloadable audio and video course for you to complete your NY CLE requirement.  For more information about the mandatory CLE requirement in New York, please click here NY CLE.


[1] New York MCLE: Experienced Attorneys

http://www.attorneycredits.com/wordpress/2013/02/new-york-mcle-experienced-attorneys/

[2] New York CLE Program Rules

http://www.nycourts.gov/attorneys/cle/programrules.pdf

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How to Avoid Legal Malpractice Claims

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Over the last few decades, the incidence of legal malpractice claims has greatly increased as more clients have begun to sue their attorneys for substandard work.  There are many reasons to explain the increased number of legal malpractice claims, and the recent downturn in the economy has only generated more malpractice claims.  In order to avoid these lawsuits, attorneys must be extremely cognizant of their ethical duties to their clients and also the major sources of client discontent that lead to the greatest amount of legal malpractice claims.

“Pay attention to the details because they separate mediocrity from excellence” – Mark Wilson

To learn how you can provide excellent service to your clients and avoid legal malpractice claims, please join attorney Mark Wilson for a look at the areas that lead to malpractice liability.  Establishing a good rapport with the client, paying attention to your ethical duties and providing excellent legal service to your client can help you to avoid major pitfalls and malpractice lawsuits.  The main issues discussed include recent malpractice trends, how best to proceed if you decide to accept the case, the importance of using fee agreements, early preparation, giving the client guidance, intelligent time keeping, learning your craft and client trust accounts.  To access the course, please click here: How to Avoid Legal Malpractice Claims.

Further topics addressed in this CLE course include:

  • The reputation of attorneys
  • Malpractice statistics
  • The downturn in the economy & the increased incidence of malpractice claims
  • Deciding whether to accept the assignment
  • Avoiding difficult clients
  • Appearance & reality
  • Documenting the attorney-client relationship
  • Avoiding conflicts of interest
  • Conflict waiver letters
  • The retainer agreement
  • Corresponding frequently with clients
  • Jury instructions
  • Why information is not enough
  • Block billing
  • “No charge”
  • Proper staffing
  • Timekeepers
  • Competence
  • Workload
  • Client trust accounts
  • Attention to detail

A seasoned trial attorney and skilled negotiator, Mark B. Wilson has won nearly every case he has tried or arbitrated and has lost only one jury trial in which the appellate court reversed the judgment in his client’s favor.  He tries cases in both federal and state courts in a variety of practice areas, including copyright infringement, construction defects, covenants not to compete, breach of contract, attorney malpractice, unlawful detainer and personal injury.  He and his partner Gerald Klein have recovered nearly $100 million in plaintiffs’ cases and have won defense verdicts in “bet the company” cases where millions of dollars were on the table.  For eight consecutive years he has been acknowledged as a Southern California Super Lawyer in the areas of business litigation, construction litigation and intellectual property litigation. He is also recognized as one of the top trial attorneys in Orange County by OC Register Metro magazine and Mr. Wilson has also achieved an “AV” rating from Martindale-Hubbell.  A frequent lecturer to bar organizations on modern trial techniques, he has also authored several articles on trial practice.

This CLE course on handling media attention is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country.  For more information about CLE in Illinois  please click the following link: Illinois CLE.

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Top 10 California Legal Ethics Rulings of 2013

In today’s world, the law and your ethical duties change rapidly.  From conflicts of interest to protecting confidential information, new cases are constantly redefining your ethical duties as an attorney.  If you are a California attorney and you want to keep current on the main ethical cases from 2013, we have just added an excellent new CLE course.

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In The Top 10 California Legal Ethics Rulings of 2013, Employment Law attorney Dan Eaton provides a comprehensive review of the top ethical decisions in California from 2013.  The ethical decisions discussed arise from a variety of practice areas and deal with various ethical issues, from threatening extortion to confidentiality & privilege.

This legal ethics CLE course discusses the following California decisions from 2013:

  • Lopez v. Banuelos (E.D.Cal. 2013) 2013 WL 4815699
  • Rickley v. Goodfriend (2013) 212 Cal.App.4th 1136
  • U.S. ex rel. Hartpence v. Kinetic Concepts, Inc.,
  • Mt. Holyoke Homes, L.P. v. Jeffer Mangels Butler & Mitchell, LLP (2013) 219 Cal.App.4th 1299
  • Jay v. Mahaffey (2013) 218 Cal.App.4th 1522
  • Zimmerman v. Superior Court (2013) 220 Cal.App.4th 389
  • Mendoza v. Hamzeh (2013) 215 Cal.App.4th 799
  • Yanez v. Plummer (2013) 221 Cal.App.4th 180
  • Citizens for Ceres v. Superior Court (2013) 217 Cal.App.4th 889
  • Khani v. Ford (2013) Cal.App.4th 916

Daniel E. Eaton is a shareholder with Seltzer Caplan McMahon Vitek in San Diego in the Litigation Department and practices employment law.  Mr. Eaton received his B.S. from Georgetown University in 1984 and received his law degree, cum laude, from the Harvard Law School in 1989.  Prior to joining Seltzer Caplan McMahon Vitek, Mr. Eaton was with Proskauer Rose in Los Angeles from 1995 to 1998 and with Gray Cary Ware & Freidenrich from 1989 to 1995. He was an Adjunct Professor of Law at Western State College of Law in 1993. He also has taught employment law at the University of California, San Diego, and both human resources law and business ethics at San Diego State University. From 1983 to 1986, Mr. Eaton served as an aide to Pennsylvania’s U.S. Senator Arlen Specter.

This legal ethics CLE course is currently accredited in California.  For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: California CLE.

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CLE Course: The Limits of Persuasion: Know Them and Use Them

Influencing other people can be a challenging task.  Many people hold strong beliefs and opinions on a number of positions – from gun regulation to their favorite sports team.  However, persuasion techniques can be employed to influence and convince others to change their beliefs or at least get them to move away from an entrenched position.

Robert Cialdini – Six Principles of Influence

  1. Reciprocity
  2. Commitment
  3. Social Proof
  4. Liking
  5. Authority
  6. Scarcity

Much as been written about the art and science of persuasion and how attorneys can utilize influence and persuasion principles to become better advocates for their clients.  Persuasion is the ability to change a person’s behavior or beliefs about a certain position – essentially the ability to influence other’s beliefs and opinions.  Some have even called persuasion the psychology of why people say yes, and as zealous advocates for our clients persuasion can be an incredibly invaluable tool.

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If you would like to learn more about persuasive techniques for attorneys, we have recently added an excellent new CLE course entitled The Limits of Persuasion: Know Them and Use Them.  In this entertaining and informative course, Chris Arledge delves into the power of persuasion and teaches attorneys how to deploy persuasive techniques in the courtroom and their everyday practice.  You will learn the four main principles of persuasion and how to use these principles to become a skilled persuader and a better legal practitioner.

The Four Principles of Persuasion for attorneys:

  1. Likability
  2. Trust
  3. Ability to Process Your Story
  4. Don’t Take Them Too Far From Home

Further issues discussed in this online CLE course include the public’s perception of attorneys, avoiding the trap of demonizing the opposition, remembering your primary goal, reciprocity, authenticity, communicating with individuals, the four benefits of story, being cognizant of roles, miscasting yourself & clients, persuading the jury, building your case around an underlying value, consistency, timing and understanding the jury.

Christopher W. Arledge is a co-founder and managing partner of One LLP.  His primary focus at One LLP is intellectual property litigation, particularly disputes over copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets.  In recent years, he has handled disputes involving the intellectual property of celebrities like Madonna, Don Henley, Kobe Bryant, Bette Davis, and Perez Hilton.  Lawyers are called, above all, to persuade, and Chris therefore studies and teaches the principles of persuasion.  He has taught the Art of Persuasion at Chapman Law School and has lectured on persuasion to some of the largest, most prestigious professional firms in the country, including Munger Tolles, O’Melveny, Jones Day, and Deloitte.  Chris has polished his advocacy skills outside the courtroom as well, participating in speaking engagements and debates sponsored by groups such as the American Bar Association, the Federal Bar Association, the University of Southern California, Chapman Law School, Whittier Law School, the Anti-Defamation League, California Lawyers for the Arts, and various Inns of Court and local bar associations, and by serving as a legal expert on a number of nationally syndicated radio programs.

This CLE course on persuasion techniques for attorneys is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Georgia (GA)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Oregon (OR)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)
  • Tennessee (TN)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) in New York (NY) and around the country.  For more information about continuing legal education (CLE) in New York, please click the following link: New York CLE.


[1] Robert Cialdini’s Six Principles of Influence

http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/six-principles-influence.htm

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