OR MCLE: Elder Abuse Reporting Requirements for Oregon Attorneys

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America is getting older. As the baby boomers start to reach their “golden years” our population is growing older and living longer. And as the number of elder Oregonians continues to increase, so does the need to ensure this vulnerable segment of society are properly cared for and protected by the law.

To help ensure the well being of elder members of society in Oregon, the Oregon legislature recently passed a new law creating a mandatory duty on Oregon attorneys to report elder abuse. The law became effective on January 1, 2015, and it requires attorneys to report elder abuse if certain conditions are met – subject to ethical exceptions.

This CLE course will introduce you to the new mandatory Elder Abuse reporting duty for Oregon attorneys and mainly addresses the rationale behind the new law/duty, elder abuse statistics, the common abusers, the Department of Human Services (DHS) & enforcement, your ethical duty, reasonable cause to believe, “comes into contact with the abuser or abused,” types of elder abuse, the exceptions to mandatory reporting and the mechanics of reporting. To access the course, please click here: Elder Abuse Reporting Requirements for Oregon Attorneys.

Further topics covered in this course include:

  • Changing demographics
  • Protecting those that cannot protect themselves
  • Substantiated findings of abuse
  • Where the abuse occurs
  • Resources & agencies responsible for enforcement
  • “Reasonable suspicion of abuse”
  • Third party information
  • Financial exploitation
  • Verbal abuse
  • Physical abuse
  • Neglect
  • The warning signs of abuse
  • RPC 1.6(a) & (b)
  • The Duty of Confidentiality
  • The Attorney-Client privilege
  • Disclosing information that is detrimental to the client
  • When you must report
  • When you may report
  • When you must not report
  • The nuts & bolts of reporting

Beginning with the 2015 reporting year all members of the Oregon State Bar will need to complete 1 credit hour on the mandatory elder abuse reporting requirement for Oregon attorneys. The elder abuse course is required for reporting periods of 2015, 2016, and 2017. This replaces the child abuse reporting credit. For 2018, 2019, and 2020 it switches back to requiring the child abuse reporting credit. After this, it switches back and forth for each reporting cycle between the two requirements.  This course has been approved for CLE credit in Oregon. For more information about CLE in Oregon, please click this link: OR CLE.

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CLE Course on How the Supreme Court Analyzes Evolving Technology

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Almost 100 years ago, the Supreme Court was forced to decide on the admissibility of evidence from a groundbreaking new technology – the systolic blood pressure test. At the time, the evidence from the systolic blood pressure test – or lie detector test – was held to be inadmissible because it was not “sufficiently established to have gained general acceptance in the particular field in which it belongs.”

Advances in sciences yield new, novel and high technology, much of which has significant legal ramifications. Unfortunately, technology evolves much faster than the laws can keep up and courts are forced to apply old legal doctrines to novel situations in our new digital world.

Fast-forward almost a century later and the Supreme Court now routinely decides major cases involving technology, reasonable expectations of privacy and the Fourth Amendment. In 2001, the Supreme Court aptly noted in Kyllo v. United States that technology has the power to erode Fourth Amendment privacy – and that seems to be exactly what’s happened in the ensuing years. Today, technological advances have given law enforcement powerful new tools at their disposal — stingrays, drones, thermal imaging devices, facial recognition software — to conduct surveillance and investigate criminal activity. Yet courts have been slow to keep pace with these technological changes and they have been split all over the map on what constitutes a violation of the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against unreasonable search and seizure.

To learn more about how the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) has analyzed evolving technologies, please join attorney and forensic expert Herbert Joe as he details the court’s analysis on emerging technologies – from the lie detector test to digital technologies. Mr. Joe presents and discusses Frye vs. U.S. (polygraph machine), Katz vs. U.S. (recording devices), Kyllo vs. U.S. (thermal imaging devices), U.S. vs. Jones (GPS tracking devices), U.S. vs. Wurie and Riley vs. California (smartphone searches).

To access this course please click here: From Katz to Riley: How SCOTUS Analyzes Evolving Technology. Herbert Joe is a forensic scientist with 4 degrees, Graduate Faculty (Law) at the University of Phoenix and a Registered Patent Attorney. As managing partner of Yonovitz & Joe, L.L.P., his firm has been involved in 1000s of cases involving forensic audio/acoustic/voice/video evidence for the past 27 years. He is also a Certified Mediator, licensed to practice law in Texas and Oklahoma, a Registered Patent Attorney with the United States Patent & Trademark Office, and a Member of the College of the State Bar of Texas. He has testified in state and Federal courts in civil and criminal cases throughout the U.S. and overseas as an expert witness in forensic audio, acoustic, voice and video evidence, as well as an expert in patent law in patent infringement cases. Clients include all levels of state and Federal governmental entities, law firms throughout the world, Fortune 100 companies, Public Defender’s Office throughout the U.S.

This CLE course is currently offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country. For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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The Naked Lawyer CLE: Understanding Professional Liability & Insurance Coverage

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Robert is the Managing Partner of a very successful five-lawyer firm that has been in business for over thirty years. In that time, Robert’s firm has built up a substantial reputation that is second to none in the local community… and then “it” happened. Robert received calls from two of the firm’s top clients on the same day – they had both been the victims of identity fraud. At first Robert was baffled and frankly insulted that they would blame him, as his firm has state of the art firewalls protecting their computer systems. “How does this happen and why blame us,” he thought. Then he remembered that one of the associates at the firm had lost his tablet a few weeks ago in a taxi when he was taking a taxi back to the firm.

Cyber Liability and Data Breach protect attorneys and law firms from any type of occurrence where clients or employees information becomes compromised. This includes third party damages and defense costs.

A lawyer and law firm’s liability is much great than malpractice exposure. Cyber liability, car accidents by employees in the course of employment, discrimination lawsuits – these are just a few areas where lawyers and firms face potential exposure to liability. In this course, Michael Carroll will teach you how to protect you and your firm against these potential risks. Michael mainly discusses data breach insurance, cyber liability, office business insurance, hired and non-owned auto coverage and the grisly gremlins of insurance exclusion (earthquakes, floods, harassment, discrimination & termination) and malpractice liability & coverage. To access the course please click here: The Naked Lawyer: Understanding Professional Liability.

Additional topics covered in this CLE course:

  • Workers’ compensation
  • General liability
  • State data breach laws
  • The results of a data breach for your law firm
  • Cyber liability
  • Car accidents by employees in the course of employment
  • Employment Practices Liability Insurance (EPLI)
  • Optional endorsements
  • The fine points of deductibles
  • Loss only deductibles
  • CEOL (Claim Expenses outside Policy Limits) vs. CEIL (Claim Expenses inside Policy Limits)

Specializing in law firms for over twenty-five years, Michael Carroll started Insuring Lawyer in 2002 and now has offices in Ohio and Arizona. His firm has been selected as a Best Practices agency for fourteen consecutive years. Michael is a featured speaker at many national events to lawyers. He also has authored a critically acclaimed book for Lawyers titled The Naked Insurance Lawyer. Michael also is the host of his national TV Show for Lawyers titled The Naked Lawyer Show with Michael Carroll.

This CLE course is currently offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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CLE Course: What Every Lawyer Needs to Know About Translation and Interpretation

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Regardless of your practice area, there will probably be a time in your career when you need the services of a translator or interpreter – or both – to effectively provide legal services to your clients. This course will discuss the different practical issues that attorneys need to be aware of when finding, selecting and using translation and interpretation services in their law practice.

Both the United States and Canada have high rates of immigration. The main issue is that many immigrants speak their own native language and need legal services and instructions in their native language.

In this CLE course, lawyer-linguist Suzanne Deliscar provides attorneys with information on how to find translation and interpretation services, how to utilize these services appropriately in your legal cases and how to use these services to fully represent your clients. To access the course please click here: What Every Lawyer Needs to Know About Translation and Interpretation.

Additional topics discussed in this CLE program include:

  • Why we want to work with clients that don’t speak English as their native language
  • Using these services to assist clients
  • How to find qualified interpreters and translators
  • Best practices & cultural sensitivity
  • Avoiding the cultural minefield
  • Best practices in providing legal services in other languages

Suzanne E. Deliscar, a lawyer-linguist, focuses on matters involving both legal and language issues. Based in Ontario, Canada, her practice was created through the combination of her language skills in French and Spanish and the practice of law in a variety of areas, including civil litigation, wills & estates, and family law. Ms. Deliscar has extensive experience in the translation of a variety of legal documents, having translated, reviewed, analyzed and abstracted over 500 Spanish language contracts for a large multinational corporation. Ms. Deliscar is also experienced in providing document review in French. She has developed and presented over 20 popular training webinar programs in the areas of legal translation, official document translation, and marketing for translators and interpreters, lawyers, and fellow lawyer-linguists.

This CLE course is currently offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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CLE Course: Avoiding a Cultural Minefield in Your Practice

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In both America and Canada, we have societies that have high rates of immigration. With high rates of immigration comes groups of individuals that need legal services and support from the legal community – but at the same time bring along certain issues that need to be properly addressed to provide legal services to these individuals.

How can you avoid cultural minefields in your legal practice to fully and ethically represent all your clients?

To learn about the ways that you can avoid running into problems when dealing with cross-cultural issues when dealing with clients please join attorney and linguist Suzanne Deliscar as she details how you can avoid key cultural minefields in your law practice. The minefields and topics covered include knowing who your client is, knowing the language access laws in your state, being wary of the family/friend interpreter, determining if you need a translator/interpreter or both, starting your search early, avoiding making culturally inappropriate comments or jokes, knowing your limitations if you are a multilingual lawyer, not getting duped, hiring a professional translator if you need one, using an interpreter to avoid machine translation and treating all clients the same. To access the course please click here: How To Avoid A Cultural Minefield In Your Law Practice.

How to Avoid a Cultural Minefield in Your Practice

  1. Know Thy Client
  2. Beware the Family or Friend Interpreter
  3. Know the Language Access Laws in Your Jurisdiction
  4. Determine if You Need a Translator, Interpreter, or Both
  5. Avoid Making Culturally Inappropriate Comments or Jokes

A Lawyer-Linguist, Suzanne E. Deliscar focuses on matters involving both legal and language issues. Based in Ontario, Canada, her practice was created through the combination of her language skills in French and Spanish and the practice of law in a variety of areas, including civil litigation, wills & estates, and family law. Ms. Deliscar has extensive experience in the translation of a variety of legal documents, having translated, reviewed, analyzed and abstracted over 500 Spanish language contracts for a large multinational corporation. She has developed and presented over 20 popular training webinar programs in the areas of legal translation, official document translation, and marketing for translators and interpreters, lawyers, and fellow lawyer-linguists.

This CLE course is currently offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country. For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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WV CLE for West Virginia Attorneys

screen-captureStarting in 2015 Attorney Credits now offers CLE in every state across the country that allows online CLE… we’ve come a long way since the days of only offering online CLE in California! We also recently began offering online CLE for West Virginia attorneys. West Virginia attorneys must complete 24 WV CLE credits each biennial WV CLE compliance period, including 3 credit hours of legal ethics.

West Virginia CLE Compliance & Reporting

  • Reporting Cycle: 2 years
  • Required Credits: 24
  • Compliance Deadline: June 30
  • Reporting Deadline: July 31

West Virginia attorneys may satisfy up to twelve (12) CLE credit hours each biennial compliance period through Attorney Credits’ online and downloadable WV CLE courses. The deadline to complete your required West Virginia CLE is June 30 and all WV CLE hours must be reported by July 31 of your reporting year.

West Virginia attorneys may satisfy up to twelve (12) credit hours of their CLE requirements through online and downloadable on-demand CLE courses.

Attorney Credits is approved by the West Virginia State Bar to provide online WV CLE courses and all of Attorney Credits’ WV CLE courses have been pre-approved for WV CLE credit. Our pre-selected one-click West Virginia Bundles are the quickest way to get started on your WV CLE requirement. You may also Build Your Own West Virginia CLE Bundle, select individual WV CLE courses, or choose Unlimited CLE for 1 full year. For more information about CLE in West Virginia please click here: WV CLE.

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Washington CLE: 45 Credits Every 3 Years

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Washington attorneys must complete at minimum or 45 CLE credit hours every three years in order to complete the Washington minimum continuing legal education (MCLE) requirement. As part of the 45 unit WA MCLE requirement, Washington attorneys must also complete at least 6 credit hours of Legal Ethics or Professional Responsibility each compliance period.

Washington MCLE Compliance & Reporting

  • Reporting Cycle: 3 years
  • Compliance Deadline: December 31
  • Reporting Deadline: February 1

You must have all of your Washington CLE completed before December 31 if this is your compliance year. Group 3 attorneys are the next group up for CLE compliance at the end of 2015.[1] You must also report your WA CLE compliance by February 1, 2016.

Online and downloadable CLE courses are considered self-study according to the Washington MCLE Rules.

Washington attorneys may complete at least a portion of their WA MCLE requirement through online WA CLE courses in 2015. Lawyers in Washington may satisfy up to 22.5 credits of the required 45 CLE requirements through online and downloadable CLE courses. Starting in 2016, Washington attorneys will be able to take all 45 credit hours through online and downloadable CLE courses. Click here for more information about CLE in Washington: WA CLE.

[1] Group 3 attorneys: admitted in 1984 through 1990, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2011 and 2014

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Virginia CLE: October 31 VA CLE Deadline

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Attorneys licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Virginia must complete at least 12 VA CLE credit hours each annual VA CLE compliance period. To properly complete the 12 credit hour Virginia CLE requirement at least 2 credit hours must be earned in the area of legal ethics or professionalism.[1]

Virginia CLE Compliance & Reporting

  • Reporting Cycle: Annual
  • Compliance Deadline: October 31
  • Reporting Deadline: December 15

Please note that the Virginia CLE Regulations now require that each annual compliance at least 4 hours of VA CLE credit be earned in VA CLE programs that include simultaneous, live interaction with the presenter. Virginia attorneys may earn 8 credit hours through AttorneyCredits.com each compliance period, including the 2 unit legal ethics requirement. Virginia attorneys must complete the required annual requirement of 12 credit hours of VA CLE by October 31.[2]

Virginia attorneys may earn 8 credit hours through online, on-demand CLE courses each compliance period, including the 2 credit hour legal ethics requirement.

All VA CLE courses offered by Attorney Credits have been directly approved by the Virginia State Bar CLE Department. Attorney Credits online and offline CLE courses qualify for Distance Learning CLE credit in Virginia. All Virginia CLE courses are accompanied by high quality written materials that include practice documents, statutes, case law and commentary. For more information about CLE in Virginia please click here: VA CLE.

[1] Please note that Virginia recently amended its CLE Rules and at least 4 of the 12 required VA CLE credit hours must now be completed through live, interactive VA CLE programs.

[2] Virginia is a self-reporting state and attorneys must report completion of the VA CLE requirement by December 15 to avoid fines. To report your VA CLE credit, you can choose to report compliance via regular mail or report your VA CLE compliance online through the Virginia Bar website. If you fail to properly complete the 12 required VA CLE credit hours by October 31 you will be assessed a $100 non-compliance fee. Failing to report your VA CLE compliance by the December 15 VA compliance reporting deadline will result in another $100 late filing fee.

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CLE for Vermont Attorneys

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Attorney Credits now offers CLE in every state across the country that allows online CLE. In our effort to reach as many attorneys as possible around the county we recently began offering CLE for Vermont attorneys. Vermont attorneys must complete twenty (20) credit hours of VT CLE activities every two years, including at least two (2) hours of legal ethics and two (2) hours of professionalism.

Vermont CLE Compliance & Reporting

  • Reporting Cycle: 2 years
  • Required Credits: 20
  • Compliance Deadline: June 30
  • Reporting Deadline: June 30

Vermont attorneys may satisfy up to ten (10) CLE credit hours each biennial compliance period through Attorney Credits’ online and downloadable Vermont CLE courses. Please note that courses meeting the professionalism requirement must be live face-to-face and participatory and may not be fulfilled through online or self-study courses. The deadline to complete and report your VT CLE compliance is June 30.

Vermont attorneys may satisfy up to ten (10) credit hours of their CLE requirements through online and downloadable on-demand courses.

Our pre-selected one-click Vermont Bundles are the quickest way to get started on your VT CLE requirement. You may also Build Your Own Vermont CLE Bundle, select individual VT CLE courses, or choose Unlimited CLE for 1 full year. For more information about CLE in Vermont please click here: VT CLE.

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Utah CLE: 12 Online UT CLE Hours Allowed

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Utah attorneys that are on active status must complete at least 24 hours of approved UT CLE every two years. As part of the 24 credit hour requirement Utah attorneys must also complete at least three hours of courses accredited in legal ethics. Please note that 1 of the 3 required legal ethics hours must be in the area of professionalism and civility.

Utah CLE Compliance & Reporting

  • Reporting Cycle: 2 years
  • Compliance Deadline: June 30
  • Reporting Deadline: July 31

Utah attorneys may complete online CLE courses to fulfill a portion of their biennial UT CLE requirement. Online Utah CLE courses are considered self-study CLE in Utah. Utah attorneys are limited to 12 online CLE credits of the 24 required by the Utah MCLE Rules

Online and downloadable Utah CLE courses are considered self-study CLE credit.

The compliance deadline for attorneys that were due to complete the UT CLE requirement this year was June 30. Your UT CLE compliance must be reported by July 31. If your UT CLE requirement is not completed by June 30 or reported by July 31 there is a $100 late filing fee.  For more information about Utah CLE please click here: UT CLE.

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