Florida CLE: When is My FL CLE Reporting Period?

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Every three-year FL CLE compliance period Florida attorneys must complete 30 total FL CLE credit hours.[1] Florida Bar members are required to report FL CLE hours completed every three years.[2] Each member of the Florida Bar is assigned a three-year reporting cycle that is chosen at random by a computer program.

The Supreme Court of Florida adopted the Florida CLER in 1988. Every three-year FL CLE compliance period attorneys that are members of The Florida Bar must complete 30 total FL CLE credit hours.

Three months prior to your CLE due date you will receive notice from the Florida Bar advising you that your reporting period is upcoming. The Florida Bar will send you notice regarding the FL CLE that you have completed. If your FL CLE requirement has been satisfied at that time, you will receive a Notice of Compliance. If this Notice of Compliance is accurate, you will need to take no further steps.

You can find your reporting date on the mailing label of The Florida Bar News.

If your FL CLE requirement has not been satisfied, you will receive a Reporting Affidavit. This affidavit must be returned by the reporting date with an explanation of how the CLE deficit was cured. For more information about Florida CLE please click the following link: FL CLE.

[1] As part of the 30 credit hour FL CLE requirement, Florida attorneys must also complete 5 credit hours in the area of legal ethics.

[2] No later than the last day of the 3-year cycle.

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Texas CLE: Can I Carry Hours Forward to the Next Year?

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Attorneys licensed to practice in Texas must complete a minimum of 15 Texas CLE credit hours each annual TX MCLE compliance period as part of the mandatory CLE requirement in Texas. Texas attorneys must also complete at least 3 credit hours of Legal Ethics or Professional Responsibility to properly complete the mandatory 15 credit hour TX MCLE requirement. But are you allowed to carry over credits from one TX MCLE compliance period to the next?

Texas MCLE Compliance & Reporting Requirements

  • Reporting Cycle: Annual
  • Compliance Deadline: Last day of the month preceding your birth month
  • Reporting Deadline: First day of attorney’s birth month

Yes, Texas attorneys are allowed to carry over TX CLE credit from one compliance period to the next. Texas attorneys may carry over fifteen (15) credit hours from one TX MCLE compliance period to the next, including three (3) Legal Ethics and Professionalism credits. This carryover provision applies to one (1) year only.

Accredited continuing legal education and self-study completed during any compliance year in excess of the minimum fifteen (15) hour requirement for such period will be applied to the following compliance year’s requirement.

If you still have questions about TX MCLE please contact the State Bar of Texas. Attorney Credits also offers helpful information about continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys licensed to practice law in Texas. Please click this link to access more information about CLE in Texas: TX CLE.

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CLE Course: The Art of Oral Advocacy… Courtroom Speaking & Beyond

screen-captureIn a recent Gallup poll only snakes came out above public speaking on a list of Americans’ fears – and public speaking ended up ahead of spiders & insects and being locked in a small space. Yes, speaking in front of people is scary proposition. And even if you will never set foot in a courtroom, you must still be an effective speaker and communicator in order to communicate ideas in meetings, educate new lawyers, impress partners in your firm and advocate effectively for your client. However, many attorneys become extremely uncomfortable and tongue-tied when they find themselves standing in front of a group of people – whether in court or in public.

Above all, lawyers are called on to persuade. – Chris Arledge

If you would like to learn about becoming a more effective oral advocate, please join attorney Chris Arledge for an extremely entertaining and informative CLE course on speaking in the courtroom and beyond. The main topics discussed by Mr. Arledge include maintaining the proper mindset, being yourself, body movement and voice. To access the course please click here: The Art of Oral Advocacy: Courtroom Speaking & Beyond.

Additional areas covered include:

  • The main difficulties of speaking in front of people
  • People’s short attention spans
  • Formulating a strategy
  • Reaching your goal
  • Losing your audience
  • Drawing your audience back in
  • The use of eye contact
  • Pacing in the courtroom
  • Using your hands
  • Transitioning between topics
  • Gestures
  • Learning to love the silence
  • Filling your speech with nonsense sounds
  • Losing credibility
  • Using pauses in your speech
  • Talking too fast
  • Marinating the great point
  • Breaking up the monotony
  • Varying the volume of your speech

Christopher W. Arledge is a co-founder and managing partner of One LLP. His primary focus at One LLP is intellectual property litigation, particularly disputes over copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets. He has handled disputes involving the intellectual property of celebrities like Madonna, Don Henley, Kobe Bryant, Bette Davis, and Perez Hilton. Above all, lawyers are called to persuade, and Chris therefore studies and teaches the principles of persuasion. He has taught the Art of Persuasion at Chapman Law School and has lectured on persuasion to some of the largest, most prestigious professional firms in the country, including Munger Tolles, O’Melveny, Jones Day, and Deloitte. In addition, Chris has polished his advocacy skills outside the courtroom, participating in speaking engagements and debates sponsored by groups such as the American Bar Association, the Federal Bar Association, the University of Southern California, Chapman Law School, Whittier Law School, the Anti-Defamation League, California Lawyers for the Arts, and various Inns of Court and local bar associations, and by serving as a legal expert on a number of nationally syndicated radio programs.

This CLE course on becoming an effective oral advocate is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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CLE Course: Medical and Scientific Evidence Used in DUI and Drug Cases

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With marijuana being legalized both medicinally and recreationally across the country and the recent scourge of prescription drugs, increasingly more people are being convicted of driving under the influence and other crimes involving drugs. This course presented by criminal defense attorney Paul Neuharth will address the testing for chemical substances or drugs – both as to the application in a DUI defense and as to being under the influence of drugs in a general criminal defense. The same principles will apply in both types of cases.

It is important for every attorney who is representing someone charged with a drug-related driving case to gain as much knowledge and training as possible in drug recognition and the actual methods used in testing for the suspected substances.[1]

In addition to discussing the medical and scientific evidence used to detect drugs such as LSD, methamphetamines, cocaine and prescription pills such as opiates, Mr. Neuharth also discusses the detection of alcohol. This course is especially timely with the recent legalization of marijuana in Colorado and Washington and the fact that we are now starting to formulate guidelines around the rest of the country. To access the course please click here: Medical and Scientific Evidence Used in DUI and Drug Cases.

Additional issues addressed include:

  • Nanogram limits
  • Metabolites
  • The absorption of marijuana into the bloodstream
  • Experts
  • Testing
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Tolerance
  • Opiates
  • Water solubility
  • Boutique drugs such as GHB
  • Spice & MDMA
  • Field coordination tests
  • Over the counter medications such as Benadryl
  • False positives
  • Blood tests
  • Breathe tests
  • Downloading information from the portable breathalyzer
  • Calibration of the breathalyzer
  • Preliminary alcohol screening
  • The slope detector
  • Testing at the crime lab
  • The lab packet
  • Gas chromatographs
  • Blood tests

Paul H. Neuharth Jr. is a sole practitioner located in San Diego, California, with exclusive and extensive experience in administrative and criminal law. Mr. Neuharth’s firm has been Martindale-Hubble AV-rated for the last 16 years. He is listed on the American Trial Lawyers Association Top 100 Trial Lawyers for California and a top Criminal Law attorney category by The Daily Transcript (2010, 2011). Mr. Neuharth was a California State Law Enforcement Officer from 1983 to 1990, receiving 7 commendations and worked his way through his undergraduate studies and law school in that capacity.

This CLE course on the medical and scientific evidence used in DUI and drug cases is currently offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country. For more information about CLE in Illinois please click the following link: IL CLE.

[1] Navigating DUI Drug Cases

http://www.orrlaw.com/orrlawfirm/images/Orr_Chapter.pdf

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CLE Course: Structuring International Joint Ventures

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When American companies seek to expand their business abroad they face a myriad of choices and decisions. The primary consideration is how they will do business overseas. And there are a number of ways they can conduct business in foreign countries – from merely shipping goods overseas to forming a subsidiary in the foreign country. Engaging in an international joint venture is somewhere in the middle of this spectrum and it is an attractive option for many companies because it presents a manageable amount of risk while still allowing for a substantial amount of profit.

Small to medium-sized companies that consider expanding their operations internationally are faced with many questions:[1]

  • Why conduct business overseas?
  • What are the tax consequences?
  • How do we conduct due diligence?
  • What are the negotiating points of a joint venture agreement?

When you counsel business clients that are considering engaging in an international joint venture you must consider what is the best entity, what is the best way to negotiate the joint venture agreement, how to conduct due diligence, what are the tax consequences and many more important considerations. This nuts-and-bolts course presented by attorney Robert Klueger will mainly cover the legal, tax and practical aspects of forming and operating a joint venture with a foreign partner. To access the course please click here: Structuring International Joint Ventures.

Further issues addressed by Mr. Klueger include:

  • Ways that American companies can conduct business abroad
  • Shipping products overseas
  • Engaging a local sales agent
  • Selling products to a local distributor
  • Forming a subsidiary in a foreign country
  • The key aspects of an international joint venture
  • Types of entities
  • IRS Treasury Regulation 301.7701-3a
  • Assembling your team
  • Audited financial statements
  • Controlled Foreign Company (CFC) rules
  • Subpart F Income
  • Electing partnership status
  • Foreign currency restrictions
  • Investigating the foreign business partner
  • Assessing intellectual property considerations
  • Aspects unique to a foreign partnership
  • Drafting the joint venture agreement

Robert F. Klueger is a frequent lecturer on asset protection for the State Bar of California and various other groups throughout the country. He has authored numerous books and scholarly articles on both asset protection and tax planning. His published books include Buying and Selling a Business, published in 1988; Mergers & Acquisitions – a Practical Guide, published in 1989; A Guide to Asset Protection, published in 1997; Asset Protection published in 2008; Estate Planning After the New Tax Law, published in 2011, and his latest book, International Joint Ventures – A Concise Guide for Attorneys & Business Owners, which was published in 2014. His article entitled Overview of International Estate Planning appeared in the October 2012 issue of Valley Lawyer. He is one of the very few private attorneys in America who has argued a tax case before the United States Supreme Court, which resulted in a change in the tax law regarding tax refund claims filed by disabled taxpayers.[2]

This CLE course on structuring international joint ventures is currently offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country. For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

[1] Klueger & Stein, LLP Write the Book on Successfully Structuring International Joint Ventures

http://ksilaw.com/about-us/press/klueger-stein-llp-write-the-book-on-successfully-structuring-international

[2] United States v. Brockamp, 519 US 347 (1997)

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CLE Course: Online Security & Risk Basics for Attorneys

We now live in the digital era – an era of social media, mobile phones & devices and being connected and online 24/7. There are many benefits for attorneys and law firms that adopt and utilize online technology to enhance their practice and provide more cost-effective and efficient service to their clients. Unfortunately, there are numerous risks that are involved with utilizing online technologies as well.

“Which risks are relevant?  Those that impact business goals.  Which risks impact business goals?  They all do.” – Deborah Gonzalez

In this new CLE course, Deborah Gonzales of Law2SM presents the tools and resources that you need to better understand the security and reputational risks of online and digital activity for attorneys and how to mitigate those risks to minimize potential losses. The focus of Online Security & Risk Basics for Attorneys is to present security and risk management best practices that address major concerns for attorneys in our new online environment.

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There is a wealth of practical information presented in this course and Ms. Gonzalez provides numerous practice points for attorneys to adopt in their everyday practice to minimize online risks.  The main topics addressed include setting the context of our new digital world, mobile devices, apps & BYOD, reputational risk, big data, content management/marketing, compliance and what you can do to mitigate your risk.

Further issues addressed in this CLE course include:

  • The relevant risks
  • Digital threats
  • Social media/online risk
  • Online security
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Sources of risk
  • Why risks happen
  • Crafting a social media policy
  • The NLRB’s (National Labor Relations Board) role in regulation
  • The 5 C’s
  • Monitoring risks
  • Suggested alerts
  • Metadata/geo-tagging
  • Protecting your online identity
  • Compliance with rules & regulations
  • The SEC regulations
  • FTC & compliance
  • Disclaimers
  • The FCC & net neutrality
  • COPPA (Children’s’ Online Privacy Protection Act)
  • The compliance toolkit
  • Audits & assessment
  • SLA™ Risk Assessment
  • Protecting yourself and your firm through insurance coverage

The founder of Law2SM, Deborah Gonzalez is an attorney whose legal practice focuses on music, art, entertainment, digital, social media and online law. She obtained her JD from New York Law School and is licensed to practice in both New York and in Georgia. Her clients include galleries, museums, artists & art professionals, animators, filmmakers, musicians & music professionals, authors, and various other creative professionals. Ms. Gonzalez is a member of the Georgia Production Partnership, Georgia Entertainment Association, Women in Animation, and the Entertainment Law sections of the Georgia and New York Sate Bar Associations. She speaks at various industry conferences around the world, such as SEIGE CON and SIAF, on legal issues and concerns for artists of all genres.  Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country. To access more information about Illinois CLE please click the following link: IL CLE:

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Digital Citizenship in Schools: From Policy to Practice

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The schools of today are very different than the schools of our youth. Students today are faced with cyberbullying, sexting, Facebook and all the novel problems that our new digital world has created over the last decade. Schools and school districts must know how to address and respond to these new issues created by digital technologies so they can best help students and avoid potential liability.

In an era of sexting, cyberbullying, and Facebook, school administrators walk a fine line in trying to provide a safe school environment and at the same time, trying not to infringe on student first amendment rights. – Gretchen Shipley

If you would like to learn more about emerging legal issues in schools created by technology please join Gretchen Shipley as she uses a hypothetical fact pattern to discuss these emerging issues. The main topics covered by Mrs. Shipley include search & seizure, mandatory reporting of abuse & neglect, sexting, social networking, teacher-student online communication, teachers’ cyber conduct, student discipline for online speech, bring your own device & equal access, cyberbullying, student privacy rights and potential breaches of privacy law.  To access the course please click here: Digital Citizenship in Schools: From Policy to Practice.

Further issues discussed include:

  • eMatters
  • Klump v. Nazareth
  • Sexting by students
  • Freedom of association
  • “Fitness to teach”
  • The “related to school activity” standard
  • The substantial disruption standard
  • S. v. Blue Mountain
  • FERPA
  • CIPA
  • J.C. v. Beverly Hills
  • The Fourth Amendment
  • COPPA
  • GeoLocation & iPad tracking
  • School video cameras
  • Pictures on school websites
  • Data mining by technology vendors
  • Social media monitoring (GeoListening)
  • Device search & seizure

Gretchen Shipley is a partner in the San Diego office of Fagen Friedman & Fulfrost and co-chair of the firm’s eMatters Practice Group. A respected legal leader in education law and technology, Mrs. Shipley advises school districts and delivers workshops to students, employees and district leaders nationwide on the promotion of cyber-citizenship in the school community and the implications of cyber-misconduct in the classroom and workplace. She has also collaborated with the Association of California School Administrators to co-produce the popular “Logged On” seminars, created to offer guidance on employee and student issues that stem from embedding technology into public education.

This CLE course on digital citizenship in schools is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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CLE Course: Advanced Asset Protection Planning

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For the past several years, asset protection has been one of the fastest growing areas of law. Asset protection is also one of the most controversial areas of law because the goal is to shield assets from the reach of creditors. Properly implemented asset protection planning should be both legal and ethical and it should not be based on hiding assets or on secrecy and it is not a means or an excuse to avoid or evade U. S. taxes. Asset protection should simply be about structuring the ownership of one’s assets to safeguard them from potential future risks.

There is no one “magic bullet” in asset protection and the term “asset protection” encompasses a number of planning and structuring mechanisms that may be implemented by a practitioner to minimize a client’s exposure to risk.  Most asset protection structures are commonly used business and estate planning tools – such as limited liability companies, family limited partnerships and trusts.

For each client the asset protection solution will be different – depending on the identity of the debtor, the nature of the claim, the identity of the creditor and the nature of the assets. These are the four threshold factors that are either expressly or implicitly analyzed in each asset protection case. The analysis of these four factors determines what planning would be possible and effective for a specific client. Join attorney Jacob Stein as he discusses these factors and more in this highly informative and practical CLE course on advanced asset protection planning. The main topics discussed include the main goals of asset protection planning, specific asset protection structures and assets that are commonly protected.  To access the course please click here: Advanced Asset Protection Planning.

Further issues addressed in this CLE course include:

  • The “Home Depot” method
  • Hiding assets
  • The debtor’s examination
  • Principle asset protection structures
  • Proactive vs. reactive asset protection planning
  • Retirement plans
  • ERISA
  • Life insurance
  • Fraudulent transfer laws
  • The intent test
  • Constructive fraud
  • The attorney’s liability
  • Transferring assets between spouses
  • Common law & community property states
  • LLCs
  • Piercing the corporate veil
  • Types of assets
  • The living trust
  • Revocable & irrevocable trusts
  • The trust protector
  • Key clauses in the trust
  • Offshore structures
  • Liquid assets
  • Protecting businesses
  • The personal residence
  • The equity strip
  • Additional asset protection structures

Mr. Stein is one of the nation’s leading experts on asset protection, teaching dozens of legal seminars each year on the subjects of asset protection and advanced tax planning. He is a Certified Tax Law Specialist and is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell. Mr. Stein is the author of numerous articles on asset protection and tax planning, and is the author of Asset Protection Planning (Education Foundation, 2009) and Advanced Tax Planning Techniques (Education Foundation, 2009). He is also an adjunct professor of taxation at the CSU, Northridge Graduate Tax Program, and has been an instructor with the California CPA Education Foundation and National Business Institute (NBI) for many years. He is also a frequent guest speaker at various Bar, Estate Planning Council and CPA group meetings. Mr. Stein is admitted to practice in California and before the United States Tax Court.

This CLE course on the use of trusts in asset protection is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country. For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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CLE Course: Use of Trusts in Asset Protection

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The main goal of asset protection planning is simple: insulate assets from claims of creditors without concealing the assets or committing tax evasion. While it is generally impossible to completely and absolutely shield assets, the focus of asset protection should be on making assets more difficult and more expensive for creditor’s to reach. Trusts are often effective vehicles to protect assets because they function by splitting the beneficial enjoyment of the trust assets from their legal ownership.

Trusts function by splitting the beneficial enjoyment of the trust assets from their legal ownership. This is the chief reason that trusts are widely used in asset protection.

However, while not all types of trusts are effective asset protection devices, a properly drafted and structured trust can provide a very solid form of asset protection. In this CLE course attorney Jacob Stein details the main ways that trusts are used to protect assets from creditors. Mr. Stein also provides an overview of asset protection planning and presents numerous case examples of the use of trusts in asset protection. To access the course please click here: Use of Trusts in Asset Protection.

Further issues addressed in this CLE course include:

  • The effectiveness of asset protection
  • Making assets more difficult to reach
  • The “Home Depot” asset protection method
  • Hiding assets
  • Determining what structure to use to protect assets
  • Exemptions
  • Personal residences
  • Retirement plans
  • The types of assets that can be protected
  • Real estate
  • The use of LLCs
  • Assets & trusts
  • The limitations of trusts
  • The trust protector
  • The living trust
  • Inter vivos trusts
  • Irrevocable trusts
  • The key elements of a trust
  • The use of offshore trusts
  • The limitations of offshore trusts
  • Dealing with income producing assets

Jacob Stein of the Los Angeles firm Klueger & Stein is one of the nation’s leading experts on asset protection and is one of California’s most well known attorneys, teaching dozens of legal seminars each year on asset protection and advanced tax planning. He is a Certified Tax Law Specialist and is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell. Mr. Stein has authored numerous articles on asset protection and tax planning and he is the author of Asset Protection Planning (Education Foundation, 2009) and Advanced Tax Planning Techniques (Education Foundation, 2009). He is also an adjunct professor of taxation at the CSU, Northridge Graduate Tax Program, and has been an instructor with the California CPA Education Foundation and National Business Institute for many years. He is also a frequent guest speaker at various Bar, Estate Planning Council and CPA group meetings. Mr. Stein is admitted to practice in California and before the United States Tax Court.

This CLE course on the use of trusts in asset protection is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country. For more information about CLE in Illinois please click the following link: IL CLE.

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CLE Course: Advanced Planning with Trusts

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The primary goal of all asset protection planning is to insulate assets from claims of creditors – without concealing assets or committing tax evasion. Generally, it is impossible to completely and absolutely protect assets. The focus of asset protection is on making assets more difficult and more expensive to reach. All asset protection planning is based on two principle premises: creditors can generally reach any asset owned by a debtor, and creditors cannot reach those assets that the debtor does not own.

Not all types of trusts are effective asset protection devices, but a properly drafted and structured trust may be an almost impregnable form of asset protection.

In this obvious dichotomy, trusts are very useful because they split the beneficial enjoyment of trust assets from their legal ownership.  This is the reason that trusts are often used in asset protection. If you would like to learn more about how trusts are used in advanced asset planning and protection please join Jacob Stein as he provides a thorough and practical overview of this important topic. Mr. Stein mainly discusses trusts, specific planning areas, asset protection planning, the use of trusts in asset protection and special needs planning. To access the course please click here: Advanced Planning with Trusts.

Further issues discussed in this CLE course include:

  • The limitations of trusts
  • Ownership of trusts
  • Key elements of a trust
  • Revocable vs. irrevocable trusts
  • Trust protectors
  • Dealing with real estate
  • Where to set up the trust
  • Estate tax planning
  • AB Trusts
  • Life insurance trusts
  • Intentionally Defective Grantor Trust (IDGT)
  • Qualified Personal Residence Trust (QPRT)
  • The goal of asset protection
  • The “Home Depot” method of asset protection
  • Insulating assets
  • Fraudulent transfers
  • The Intent Test
  • Trusts & asset protection
  • Tax consequences
  • Foreign trusts
  • Choice of law
  • Needs-based government benefits

Jacob Stein is one of the nation’s leading experts on asset protection and is one of California’s best-known attorneys, teaching dozens of legal seminars each year on the subjects of asset protection and advanced tax planning. A Certified Tax Law Specialist and AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell, Mr. Stein is the author of numerous articles on asset protection and tax planning, and is the author of Asset Protection Planning (Education Foundation, 2009) and Advanced Tax Planning Techniques (Education Foundation, 2009). He is an adjunct professor of taxation at the CSU, Northridge Graduate Tax Program, and has been an instructor with the California CPA Education Foundation and National Business Institute for many years. He is also a frequent guest speaker at various Bar, Estate Planning Council and CPA group meetings. Mr. Stein is admitted to practice in California and before the United States Tax Court.

This CLE course on the use of trusts in asset protection is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country. For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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